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Child Mortality under Chinese Reforms

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  • Christopher GRIGORIOU

    ()
    (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International)

  • Patrick GUILLAUMONT

    ()
    (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International)

Abstract

This paper looks for the impact of the Chinese economic reforms on its health performance. From an appropriate health outcomes indicator, it appears that while still being one of the most performing countries, China’s relative advance decreased during the reforms. Consistent with the fact that the health system had to rely more and more on private expenditures, we find an increasing impact of income on infant survival. We also show that relative prices matter for infant survival: for a given increase of income per capita, a currency real depreciation lowers survival. Focusing on poverty reduction still seems to be in China the main way to significantly improve infant survival.

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File URL: http://publi.cerdi.org/ed/2004/2004.10.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CERDI in its series Working Papers with number 200410.

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Length: 39
Date of creation: 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cdi:wpaper:609

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Keywords: China.; policy reforms; Infant mortality rate; Child mortality rate;

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  1. Christina D. Romer & David H. Romer, 1999. "Monetary policy and the well-being of the poor," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q I, pages 21-49.
  2. Jordan Shan & Fiona Sun, 1998. "On the export-led growth hypothesis: the econometric evidence from China," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(8), pages 1055-1065.
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  4. Guillaumont Jeanneney, S. & Hua, P., 2001. "How does real exchange rate influence income inequality between urban and rural areas in China?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 529-545, April.
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  11. Liu, Yuanli & Hsiao, William C. & Eggleston, Karen, 1999. "Equity in health and health care: the Chinese experience," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 49(10), pages 1349-1356, November.
  12. Filmer, Deon & Pritchett, Lant, 1997. "Child mortality and public spending on health : how much does money matter?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1864, The World Bank.
  13. Waldmann, Robert J, 1992. "Income Distribution and Infant Mortality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1283-302, November.
  14. Guillaumont Jeanney, Sylviane & HUA, Ping, 2002. "The Balassa-Samuelson effect and inflation in the Chinese provinces," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 134-160.
  15. Horton, Sue & Kerr, Tom & Diakosavvas, Dimitris, 1988. "The social costs of higher food prices: Some cross-country evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 16(7), pages 847-856, July.
  16. David M. Drukker, 2003. "Testing for serial correlation in linear panel-data models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(2), pages 168-177, June.
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