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Bildungspolitik versus Gesundheitspolitik – Evidenzbasierte Interventionen gegen soziale Ungleichheit in Gesundheit

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  • Hendrik Jürges

    ()
    (Schumpeter School of Business and Economics, University of Wuppertal)

Abstract

In Deutschland ist soziale Ungleichheit in Gesundheit kaum in der ö entlichen Diskussion, obwohl auch hier besser gebildete, reichere, und in der beruflichen Hierarchie höher stehende Menschen zeitlebens gesünder sind und länger leben als andere. Soziale Ungleichheit wird dadurch entlang einer weiteren wichtigen Dimension verstärkt. In diesem Beitrag werden kurz Ausmaß und Dimensionen derartiger Ungleichheit in Deutschland dargestellt. In Abgrenzung zur vorherrschenden sozialepidemiologischen Literatur wird auf Basis der aktuellen gesundheits- und bildungsökonomischen Literatur diskutiert, ob und wie soziale Ungleichheit in Gesundheit mit wirtschafts- und sozialpolitischen Mitteln vermindert werden kann. Dabei wird als Defizit erkannt, dass wir aufgrund einer ausnehmend schlechten Datenlage viel zu wenig über ihre Entstehung wissen. Dies mündet in der Forderung nach einer neuen Evaluationskultur im Bereich der Bildungs- und Gesundheitspolitik.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library in its series Schumpeter Discussion Papers with number SDP14002.

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Length: 22
Date of creation: Jan 2014
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Handle: RePEc:bwu:schdps:sdp14002

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Web page: http://elpub.bib.uni-wuppertal.de

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  1. Steffen Reinhold & Hendrik Jürges, 2012. "Parental income and child health in Germany," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(5), pages 562-579, 05.
  2. Lynch, John W. & Law, Catherine & Brinkman, Sally & Chittleborough, Catherine & Sawyer, Michael, 2010. "Inequalities in child healthy development: Some challenges for effective implementation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(7), pages 1244-1248, October.
  3. John Cawley, 2006. "Contingent Valuation Analysis of Willingness to Pay To Reduce Childhood Obesity," NBER Working Papers 12510, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Anne Case & Christina Paxson, 2010. "The Long Reach of Childhood Health and Circumstance: Evidence from the Whitehall II Study," NBER Working Papers 15640, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Kemptner, Daniel & Jürges, Hendrik & Reinhold, Steffen, 2011. "Changes in compulsory schooling and the causal effect of education on health: Evidence from Germany," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 340-354, March.
  6. Anne Case & Darren Lubotsky & Christina Paxson, 2001. "Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient," NBER Working Papers 8344, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, 01.
  8. Jürges, Hendrik & Reinhold, Steffen & Salm, Martin, 2009. "Does Schooling Affect Health Behavior? Evidence from the Educational Expansion in Western Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 4330, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Hans-Martin von Gaudecker & Rembrandt D. Scholz, 2007. "Differential mortality by lifetime earnings in Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(4), pages 83-108, August.
  10. Steffen Reinhold & Hendrik Jürges, 2010. "Secondary school fees and the causal effect of schooling on health behavior," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(8), pages 994-1001, August.
  11. Mackenbach, Johan P., 2010. "Has the English strategy to reduce health inequalities failed?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(7), pages 1249-1253, October.
  12. Albouy, Valerie & Lequien, Laurent, 2009. "Does compulsory education lower mortality?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 155-168, January.
  13. Stephen Birch, 2010. "I dreamed a dream: England reduces health inequalities and wins the world cup," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(8), pages 881-885, August.
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