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What are the Economic Health Costs of Non-Action in Controlling Toxic Water Pollution?

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Author Info

  • Easter, K. William
  • Konishi, Yoshifumi
  • Raggi, Meri
  • Viaggi, Davide

Abstract

This paper identifies information that may be important in determining the benefits of preventing toxic water contamination (or equivalently cost of nonaction) when a given toxification occurs. It attempts to identify information and behavior issues that need to be considered when we estimate benefits and weigh them against the costs of removing toxins. This paper also provides “scenarios” for three toxic pollutants that are found in water bodies. We make use of two alternatives--one for developing countries and the other for developed countries--to demonstrate, with specific examples of arsenic, mercury and Atrazine, how benefit estimates and control policies vary with different assumptions concerning behavior/information and type of chemical contamination. A comparison with EU evaluation experience is also carried out.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/6656
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Minnesota, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy in its series Conference Papers with number 6656.

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Date of creation: Aug 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ags:umcicp:6656

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Related research

Keywords: Environment & the Developing World; Hydrology; Transport Geography; Environmental Economics and Policy; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

References

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  1. Hasler, Berit & Lundhede, Thomas, 2005. "Are Agricultural Measures for Groundwater Protection Beneficial When Compared to Purification of Polluted Groundwater?," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24587, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  2. Anna Alberini & Alan Krupnick, 2000. "Cost-of-Illness and Willingness-to-Pay Estimates of the Benefits of Improved Air Quality: Evidence from Taiwan," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 76(1), pages 37-53.
  3. Daniel J. Phaneuf & Catherine L. Kling & Joseph A. Herriges, 1998. "Estimation and Welfare Calculations in a Generalized Corner Solution Model with an Application to Recreation Demand," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 99-wp207, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  4. Alberini, Anna & Zanatta, Valentina & Rosato, Paolo, 2007. "Combining actual and contingent behavior to estimate the value of sports fishing in the Lagoon of Venice," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2-3), pages 530-541, March.
  5. Seung-Jun Kwak & Clifford Russell, 1994. "Contingent valuation in Korean environmental planning: A pilot application to the protection of drinking water quality in Seoul," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 4(5), pages 511-526, October.
  6. Brouwer, Roy, 2006. "Do stated preference methods stand the test of time? A test of the stability of contingent values and models for health risks when facing an extreme event," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 399-406, December.
  7. Dickie, Mark & Gerking, Shelby, 1996. "Formation of Risk Beliefs, Joint Production and Willingness to Pay to Avoid Skin Cancer," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(3), pages 451-63, August.
  8. Bryan J. Hubbell & Jeffrey L. Jordan, 2000. "Joint Production and Averting Expenditure Measures of Willingness to Pay: Do Water Expenditures Really Measure Avoidance Costs?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 427-437.
  9. Hanley, Nick, 1990. "The Economics of Nitrate Pollution," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 17(2), pages 129-51.
  10. Bartik, Timothy J., 1988. "Evaluating the benefits of non-marginal reductions in pollution using information on defensive expenditures," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 111-127, March.
  11. Robert L. Raucher, 1986. "The Benefits and Costs of Policies Related to Groundwater Contamination," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 62(1), pages 33-45.
  12. Harrington, Winston & Krupnick, Alan J. & Spofford, Walter Jr., 1989. "The economic losses of a waterborne disease outbreak," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 116-137, January.
  13. Sanchez-Choliz, Julio & Duarte, Rosa, 2005. "Water pollution in the Spanish economy: analysis of sensitivity to production and environmental constraints," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 325-338, May.
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