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Gender Impacts on Adoption of New Technologies: Evidence from Uganda

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  • Tanellari, Eftila
  • Kostandini, Genti
  • Bonabana, Jackline
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    Abstract

    This paper examines the effects of gender on the adoption of new technologies of peanut production in Eastern Uganda. The findings suggest that females adopt improved varieties at a lower rate compared to males. In addition, females in female-headed households are less likely to adopt.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/143204
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida with number 143204.

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    Date of creation: 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:saea13:143204

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    Keywords: Adoption; Gender; Uganda; Community/Rural/Urban Development; International Development;

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    1. Morris, Michael L. & Doss, Cheryl R., 1999. "How Does Gender Affect The Adoption Of Agricultural Innovations? The Case Of Improved Maize Technology In Ghana," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21609, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Simtowe, Franklin & Asfaw, Solomon & Diagne, Aliou & Shiferaw, Bekele A., 2010. "Determinants of Agricultural Technology adoption: the case of improved groundnut varieties in Malawi," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 95921, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
    3. Besley, Timothy & Case, Anne, 1993. "Modeling Technology Adoption in Developing Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 396-402, May.
    4. Kumar, Shubh K., 1994. "Adoption of hybrid maize in Zambia: effects on gender roles, food consumption, and nutrition," Research reports 100, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Simtowe, Franklin & Kassie, Menale & Asfaw, Solomon & Shiferaw, Bekele A. & Monyo, Emmanuel & Siambi, Moses, 2012. "Welfare Effects of Agricultural Technology adoption: the case of improved groundnut varieties in rural Malawi," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126761, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Akhter Ali & Awudu Abdulai, 2010. "The Adoption of Genetically Modified Cotton and Poverty Reduction in Pakistan," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(1), pages 175-192.
    7. Becerril, Javier & Abdulai, Awudu, 2010. "The Impact of Improved Maize Varieties on Poverty in Mexico: A Propensity Score-Matching Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 1024-1035, July.
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