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The Effect of Income on Health Choices: Alcohol Use

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  • Hu, Xiaowen
  • Stowe, C. Jill
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    Abstract

    This paper investigates the relation between household income level and individual alcohol consumption behavior. Data from Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) are tested utilizing a multinomial Logit method. The results show that alcohol consumption frequency positively correlates to income, but excessive alcohol use mostly occurs among lower income population.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/143060
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2013 Annual Meeting, February 2-5, 2013, Orlando, Florida with number 143060.

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    Date of creation: 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:saea13:143060

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    Related research

    Keywords: health choices; income; alcohol consumption; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Health Economics and Policy;

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

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    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy, 1986. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 41, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
    2. Robert L. Scharff & W. Kip Viscusi, 2011. "Heterogeneous Rates Of Time Preference And The Decision To Smoke," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(4), pages 959-972, October.
    3. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1994, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    4. Vivian Hamilton & Barton H. Hamilton, 1997. "Alcohol and Earnings: Does Drinking Yield a Wage Premium," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(1), pages 135-51, February.
    5. James Binkley, 2010. "Low Income And Poor Health Choices:The Example Of Smoking," Working Papers 10-3, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    6. Becker, Gary S & Grossman, Michael & Murphy, Kevin M, 1994. "An Empirical Analysis of Cigarette Addiction," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 396-418, June.
    7. Shapiro, Jesse & Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese," Scholarly Articles 2640583, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    8. Viscusi, W. Kip & Moore, Michael J., 1989. "Rates of time preference and valuations of the duration of life," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 297-317, April.
    9. Becker, Gary S & Mulligan, Casey B, 1997. "The Endogenous Determination of Time Preference," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(3), pages 729-58, August.
    10. M. Christopher Auld, 2005. "Smoking, Drinking, and Income," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).
    11. James Binkley, 2010. "Low Income and Poor Health Choices: The Example of Smoking," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(4), pages 972-984.
    12. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
    13. Stewart, Hayden & Blisard, Noel & Jolliffe, Dean, 2003. "Do Income Constraints Inhibit Spending on Fruits and Vegetables Among Low-Income Households?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 28(03), December.
    14. Cerdá, Magdalena & Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki D. & Galea, Sandro, 2011. "Lifetime income patterns and alcohol consumption: Investigating the association between long- and short-term income trajectories and drinking," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(8), pages 1178-1185.
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