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Where Will Demographics Take the Asia-Pacific Food System?

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  • Armbruster, Walter J.
  • Coyle, William T.
  • Gilmour, Brad
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    Abstract

    Demographic changes in the Asia-Pacific region - expanded urban concentration, variability in population growth within the region, and an aging population base - will drive significant food system change. Costs associated with urban congestion will test the capacity of the region's food system to deliver a continuous flow of safe, reasonably priced, fresh and processed foods. Pressure to better connect urban areas to rural hinterlands and for trade liberalization will intensify to meet food needs of these growing urban areas. Differential rates of population growth and population aging among economies will affect the quantity and composition of foods demanded, hence private sector strategies and public policies.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/58368
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its series 2004 Conference (48th), February 11-13, 2004, Melbourne, Australia with number 58368.

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    Date of creation: Feb 2004
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aare04:58368

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    Postal: AARES Central Office Manager, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU, Canberra ACT 0200
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    Related research

    Keywords: Demographic change; food system; Asia-Pacific region; Agricultural and Food Policy; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

    References

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    1. Rafael Gomez & David K. Foot, 2002. "Age Structure, Income Distribution And Economic Growth," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 36, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).
    2. David Miles, 1997. "Demographics and savings: can we reconcile the evidence?," IFS Working Papers W97/06, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Nina Kousnetzoff, 2002. "The Outlook for World Demographic Change and Growth to the Year 2030," La Lettre du CEPII, CEPII research center, issue 208.
    4. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Variyam, Jayachandran N. & Allshouse, Jane E. & Cromartie, John, 2003. "Food And Agricultural Commodity Consumption In The United States: Looking Ahead To 2020," Agricultural Economics Reports 33959, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Jane Sneddon Little & Robert K. Triest, 2002. "The impact of demographic change on U. S. labor markets," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 1, pages 47 - 68.
    6. Matthew Higgins & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 1996. "Asian Demography and Foreign Capital Dependence," NBER Working Papers 5560, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Andrew Mason, 2001. "Population Change and Economic Development: What Have we Learned from the East Asia Experience?," Working Papers 200103, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    8. Harriet Jackson & Chris Matier, . "Public Finance Implications of Population Ageing: An Update," Working Papers-Department of Finance Canada 2003-03, Department of Finance Canada.
    9. Kristin J. Forbes, 2000. "A Reassessment of the Relationship between Inequality and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 869-887, September.
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