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Why the rich should like R&D less

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  • Guido Cozzi

Abstract

It is well known that research and development (R&D) is an important engine for economic growth. Also, initial wealth inequality and subsequent economic growth are well known to be related. This paper links inequality and R&D-driven growth. It shows that in a class of economies where R&D is the main engine for growth, different wealth groups differ in their desire for aggregate innovative effort: the richer the individual the lower her ideal aggregate R&D investment. In so far as rich shareholders are able to pursue their common interests in avoiding to invest too much in R&D compared to their ideal level, a pro-labour government able to impose distortionary progressive taxation, by minimizing the difference between the rich and the poor can maximize growth. Such predicted negative relationship between desired R&D and dynastic wealth is robust to any subsidy rate lower than 100%.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow in its series Working Papers with number 2008_18.

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Date of creation: Jun 2008
Date of revision: Aug 2008
Handle: RePEc:gla:glaewp:2008_18

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Keywords: R&D and Growth; Innovation; Inequality and Growth; Redistribution and Growth;

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  1. Guido Cozzi, 2005. "A Note on Progressive Taxation and Cooperation," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 7(5), pages 859-865, December.
  2. Peretto, Pietro F, 1998. " Technological Change and Population Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 3(4), pages 283-311, December.
  3. Jakob B. Madsen & EPRU & FRU, 2007. "Semi-Endogenous Versus Schumpeterian Growth Models: Testing The Knowledge Production Function Using International Data," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 26-07, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  4. Chou, Chien-Fu & Talmain, Gabriel, 1996. " Redistribution and Growth: Pareto Improvements," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(4), pages 505-23, December.
  5. Charles I. Jones, 2004. "Growth and Ideas," NBER Working Papers 10767, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Alberto Alesina & George-Marios Angeletos, 2004. "Fairness and Redistribution," NajEcon Working Paper Reviews 122247000000000306, www.najecon.org.
  7. Foellmi, Reto & Zweimüller, Josef, 2005. "Income Distribution and Demand-Induced Innovations," CEPR Discussion Papers 4985, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Perotti, Roberto, 1996. " Growth, Income Distribution, and Democracy: What the Data Say," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 149-87, June.
  9. Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Jean-François Wen, 2008. "Redistribution and entrepreneurship with Schumpeterian growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 57-80, March.
  10. Lutz G. Arnold, 2006. "The Dynamics of the Jones R&D Growth Model," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(1), pages 143-152, January.
  11. Guido Cozzi, 2003. "Innovating on Innovations," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 93(2), pages 3-29, March-Apr.
  12. Dinopoulos, Elias & Thompson, Peter, 1998. " Schumpeterian Growth without Scale Effects," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 3(4), pages 313-35, December.
  13. Cozzi Guido & Spinesi Luca, 2004. "Information Transmission and the Bounds to Growth," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-17, March.
  14. Kristin J. Forbes, 2000. "A Reassessment of the Relationship between Inequality and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 869-887, September.
  15. Daron Acemoglu, 2007. "Introduction to Modern Economic Growth," Levine's Bibliography 122247000000001721, UCLA Department of Economics.
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