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Economists, Environmental Policies and Federalism

In: The State of Economics in Canada: Festschrift in Honour of David Slater

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  • Anthony Scott
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    Abstract

    With global warming, Canadians are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of effective environmental policies. In his paper Anthony Scott, a pioneer in the areas of resource and environmental economics in this country, provides a comprehensive discussion of the role economists can and should play in the development of more effective environmental policies. A key theme of his paper is that environmental policy, particularly in crucial areas like global air pollution, is still in its infancy and effective national institutions to respond to policy challenges are still in the developmental stage. Scott first reviews the history of environmental policy in England, the United States and Canada. He then examines the approaches of economists to environmental issues, including the market failure and ideal output approach, benefit-cost analysis of pollution, and environmental impact assessment, and identifies topics that environmental economists teach and research. The paper then compares what economists do in Canada in the environmental area compared to that in the United States, finding that academic environmental economists in Canada specialize more in theory and show little knowledge or interest in issues directly related to the environmental policy debate in their country of residence.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This chapter was published in: Patrick Grady & Andrew Sharpe (ed.) The State of Economics in Canada: Festschrift in Honour of David Slater, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, pages 405-449, 2001.

    This item is provided by Centre for the Study of Living Standards in its series The State of Economics in Canada: Festschrift in Honour of David Slater with number 17.

    Handle: RePEc:sls:secfds:17

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    Related research

    Keywords: Environment; Climate; Environmental Policy; Canada; United States; United Kingdom; Environmental Economics;

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    References

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    1. Edward A. Parson, 2000. "Environmental Trends and Environmental Governance in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 26(s2), pages 123-143, August.
    2. Roger T. Reid & Michael S. Stone, 1997. "Opportunity Costs of Spotted Owl Management Options for British Columbia," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 23(1), pages 69-82, March.
    3. R. A. Jones & P. H. Pearse & A. D. Scott, 1980. "Conditions for Cooperation on Joint Projects by Independent Jurisdictions," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 13(2), pages 231-49, May.
    4. Anthony Scott, 1993. "Does Living in Canada Make One a Canadian Economist?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 26(1), pages 26-38, February.
    5. Solow, Robert M, 1974. "The Economics of Resources or the Resources of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(2), pages 1-14, May.
    6. G. Cornelis van Kooten & Anthony Scott, 1995. "Constitutional Crisis, The Economics of Environment, and Resources Development in Western Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 21(2), pages 233-249, June.
    7. Peter Kennedy, 1999. "Learning About Environmental Damage: Implications for Emissions Trading," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(5), pages 1313-1327, November.
    8. Richard Lipsey, 2001. "Successes and failures in the transformation of economics," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 169-201.
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