Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book chapter or follow this series

Aging and Death under a Dollar a Day

In: Research Findings in the Economics of Aging

Contents:

Author Info

  • Abhijit V. Banerjee
  • Esther Duflo

Abstract

This paper uses household survey data form several developing countries to investigate whether the poor (defined as those living under $1 or $2 dollars a day at PPP) and the non poor have different mortality rates in old age. We construct a proxy measure of longevity, which is the probability that an adult's mother and father are alive. The non-poor's mothers are more likely to be alive than the poor's mothers. Using panel data set for Indonesia and Vietnam, we also find that older adults are significantly more likely to have died five years later if they are poor. The direction of causality is unclear: the poor may be poor because they are sick (and thus more likely to die), or they could die because they are poor.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c8200.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

as in new window

This chapter was published in:

  • David A. Wise, 2010. "Research Findings in the Economics of Aging," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number wise08-1.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 8200.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8200

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
    Phone: 617-868-3900
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.nber.org
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords:

    Other versions of this item:

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Thomas, D. & Frankenberg, E. & Smith, J.P., 2000. "Lost But Not Forgotten Attribution and Follow-up in the Indonesian Family Life Survey," Papers, RAND - Labor and Population Program 00-03, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
    2. Duncan Thomas & Elizabeth Frankenberg & James P. Smith, 2001. "Lost but Not Forgotten: Attrition and Follow-up in the Indonesia Family Life Survey," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(3), pages 556-592.
    3. Angus Deaton, 2005. "Measuring Poverty," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 1, March.
    4. Elizabeth Frankenberg & James P. Smith & Duncan Thomas, 2004. "Economic Shocks, Wealth and Welfare," Labor and Demography, EconWPA 0403030, EconWPA.
    5. Banerjee, Abhijit & Duflo, Esther, 2006. "The Economic Lives of the Poor," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 5968, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Abhijit Banerjee & Angus Deaton & Esther Duflo, 2004. "Wealth, Health, and Health Services in Rural Rajasthan," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 326-330, May.
    7. Banerjee, Abhijit Vinayak & Benabou, Roland & Mookherjee, Dilip (ed.), 2006. "Understanding Poverty," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, number 9780195305203, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Barrientos, Armando, 2012. "What is the Role of Social Pensions in Asia?," ADBI Working Papers, Asian Development Bank Institute 351, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    2. Sarmistha Pal & Robert Palacios, 2011. "Understanding Poverty among the Elderly in India: Implications for Social Pension Policy," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(7), pages 1017-1037.
    3. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2008. "What Is Middle Class about the Middle Classes around the World?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 22(2), pages 3-28, Spring.
    4. Armando Barrientos & Julia Mase, 2011. "Poverty transitions among older households in Brazil and South Africa," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series, BWPI, The University of Manchester 15011, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    5. Casabonne, Ursula & Kenny, Charles, 2012. "The Best Things in Life are (Nearly) Free: Technology, Knowledge, and Global Health," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 21-35.
    6. Gustavo Adolfo Caballero Orozco, 2010. "Risk Preferences Under Extreme Poverty: A Field Experiment," DOCUMENTOS CEDE, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE 007717, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:8200. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.