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Understanding Poverty

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Editor Info

  • Banerjee, Abhijit Vinayak
    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
  • Benabou, Roland
    (Princeton University)
  • Mookherjee, Dilip
    (Boston University)

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Abstract

Understanding poverty and what to do about it, is perhaps the central concern of all of economics. Yet the lay public almost never gets to hear what leading professional economists have to say about it. This volume brings together twenty-eight essays by some of the world leaders in the field, who were invited to tell the lay reader about the most important things they have learnt from their research that relate to poverty. The essays cover a wide array of topics: the first essay is about how poverty gets measured. The next section is about the causes of poverty and its persistence, and the ideas range from the impact of colonialism and globalization to the problems of "excessive" population growth, corruption and ethnic conflict. The next section is about policy: how should we fight poverty? The essays discuss how to get drug companies to produce more vaccines for the diseases of the poor, what we should and should not expect from micro-credit, what we should do about child labor, how to design welfare policies that work better and a host of other topics. The final section is about where the puzzles lie: what are the most important anomalies, the big gaps in the way economists think about poverty? The essays talk about the puzzling reluctance of Kenyan farmers to fertilizers, the enduring power of social relationships in economic transactions in developing countries and the need to understand where aspirations come from, and much else. Every essay is written with the aim of presenting the latest and the most sophisticated in economics without any recourse to jargon or technical language. Available in OSO: http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/oso/public/content/economicsfinance/0195305191/toc.html

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by Oxford University Press in its series OUP Catalogue with number 9780195305203 and published in 2006.

ISBN: 9780195305203
Order: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780195305203.do
Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780195305203

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2010. "Aging and Death under a Dollar a Day," NBER Chapters, in: Research Findings in the Economics of Aging, pages 169-203 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Apurba Krishna Deb & C. Emdad Haque, 2011. "‘Sufferings Start from the Mothers’ Womb’ : Vulnerabilities and Livelihood War of the Small-Scale Fishers of Bangladesh," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(12), pages 2500-2527, December.
  3. Tanguy Bernard & Stefan Dercon & Alemayehu Seyoum Taffesse, 2011. "Beyond Fatalism - An empirical exploration of self-efficacy and aspirations failure in Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series 2011-03, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  4. Lombardo, Vincenzo, 2008. "Poor’s behaviour and inequality traps: the role of human capital," MPRA Paper 14511, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Casey, Gregory P. & Owen, Ann L., 2010. "Inequality and fractionalization," MPRA Paper 25493, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Ssewanyana, Sarah N. & Okidi, John A., 2007. "Poverty estimates from Uganda National Household Survey III, 2005/2006," Occasional Papers 54710, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
  7. Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre, 2008. "'New' and 'Old' Social Risks: Life Cycle and Social Class Perspectives on Social Exclusion in Ireland," Papers WP226, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  8. Thomas W. Hertel & Roman Keeney & Maros Ivanic & L. Alan Winters, 2007. "Distributional effects of WTO agricultural reforms in rich and poor countries," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 22, pages 289-337, 04.
  9. Schmidt, Oliver, 2008. "The institutions of poverty," MPRA Paper 24411, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Marinko Škare & Romina Pržiklas Družeta, 2014. "Constructing Official Poverty Lines for Countries in Transition – Beyond the Poverty Line (2000-2010)," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 16(35), pages 368, February.
  11. Marcello D'Amato & Christian Di Pietro, 2011. "Occupational Mobility and Wealth Evolution in a Simple Model of Educational Investment with Credit Market Imperfections," CSEF Working Papers 300, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  12. Dilip Mookherjee & Debraj Ray, 2008. "A Dynamic Incentive-Based Argument for Conditional Transfers," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-170, Boston University - Department of Economics.

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