Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book or follow this series

Inclusive Green Growth : The Pathway to Sustainable Development

Contents:

Author Info

  • World Bank
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    As the global population heads toward 9 billion by 2050, decisions made today will lock countries into growth patterns that may or may not be sustainable in the future. Care must be taken to ensure that cities and roads, factories and farms are designed, managed, and regulated as efficiently as possible to wisely use natural resources while supporting the robust growth developing countries still need. Economic development during the next two decades cannot mirror the previous two: poverty reduction remains urgent but growth and equity can be pursued without relying on policies and practices that foul the air, water, and land. Inclusive Green Growth: The Pathway to Sustainable Development makes the case that greening growth is necessary, efficient, and affordable. Yet spurring growth without ensuring equity will thwart efforts to reduce poverty and improve access to health, education, and infrastructure services. Countries must make strategic investments and farsighted policy changes that acknowledge natural resource constraints and enable the world's poorest and most vulnerable to benefit from efficient, clean, and resilient growth. Like other forms of capital, natural assets are limited and require accounting, investment, and maintenance in order to be properly harnessed and deployed. By maximizing co-benefits and avoiding lock-in, by promoting smarter decisions in industry and society, and by developing innovative financing tools for green investment, we can afford to do the things we must.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/6058/9780821395516.pdf?sequence=1
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    as in new window
    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 6058 and published in 2012.

    ISBN: 978-0-8213-9551-6
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6058

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
    Phone: (202) 477-1234
    Email:
    Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Macroeconomics and Economic Growth Environment Urban Development;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Hallegatte, Stephane & Shah, Ankur & Lempert, Robert & Brown, Casey & Gill, Stuart, 2012. "Investment decision making under deep uncertainty -- application to climate change," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 6193, The World Bank.
    2. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1977. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 473-91, June.
    3. Matthias Kalkuhl & Ottmar Edenhofer & Kai Lessmann, 2011. "Learning or Lock-in: Optimal Technology Policies to Support Mitigation," CESifo Working Paper Series, CESifo Group Munich 3422, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Laffont, Jean-Jacques, 1996. "Industrial policy and politics," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 1-27.
    5. David Anthoff & Robert Hahn, 2010. "Government failure and market failure: on the inefficiency of environmental and energy policy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(2), pages 197-224, Summer.
    6. Avinash Dixit & Luisa Lambertini, 2003. "Interactions of Commitment and Discretion in Monetary and Fiscal Policies," Boston College Working Papers in Economics, Boston College Department of Economics 575, Boston College Department of Economics.
    7. World Bank, 2010. "World Development Report 2010," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, The World Bank, number 4387, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Avner, Paolo & Rentschler, Jun & Hallegatte, Stephane, 2014. "Carbon price efficiency : lock-in and path dependence in urban forms and transport infrastructure," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 6941, The World Bank.
    2. Altenburg, Tilman & Engelmeier, Tobias, 2013. "Boosting solar investment with limited subsidies: Rent management and policy learning in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 866-874.
    3. Emanuele Campiglio, 2013. "The structural shift to green services: A twosector growth model with public capital and open-access resources," Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment Working Papers, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment 141, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    4. Kennedy, Christopher & Corfee-Morlot, Jan, 2013. "Past performance and future needs for low carbon climate resilient infrastructure– An investment perspective," Energy Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 773-783.
    5. Stefan Dercon, 2014. "Climate Change, Green Growth and Aid Allocation to Poor Countries," CSAE Working Paper Series, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford 2014-24, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    6. Michael MacLennan, 2012. "Locating the Policy Space for Inclusive Green Growth within the SADC Extractive Sector," Policy Research Brief, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth 38, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    7. Rabia Manzoor & Ghulam Samad, 2013. "The Sustainable Green Growth Perspective of Pakistan: In the Context of Environment Friendly Technologies," CEECC Working Paper, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics 2013:04, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    8. Paul J. Burke, 2014. "Green Pricing in the Asia Pacific: An Idea Whose Time Has Come?," CCEP Working Papers, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University 1409, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    9. Anna Dimitrova & Katarina Hollan & Daphne Laster & Andreas Reinstaller & Margit Schratzenstaller & Ewald Walterskirchen & Teresa Weiss, 2013. "Literature review on fundamental concepts and definitions, objectives and policy goals as well as instruments relevant for socio-ecological transition," WWWforEurope Working Papers series, WWWforEurope 40, WWWforEurope.
    10. World Bank, 2014. "Prosperity for All / Ending Extreme Poverty : A Note for the World Bank Group Spring Meetings 2014," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, The World Bank, number 17701, August.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6058. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Breineder).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.