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Price Knowledge in Household Demand for Utility Services

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  • David W. Carter
  • J. Walter Milon

Abstract

A household’s decision to acquire price knowledge is endogenous in the demand for utility services and may affect elasticities and consumption levels. A simultaneous equation model with endogenous switching is developed to evaluate the effects of price knowledge and other sources of heterogeneity. Results indicate informed households were more responsive to average and marginal price signals. Informed households also use less water, but this is due to heterogeneity rather than price knowledge. Controlling for heterogeneity, price knowledge actually increases monthly water usage. The implications of accounting for differences in price knowledge in utility demand modeling and demand management policy are discussed.

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File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/81/2/265
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

Volume (Year): 81 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:81:y:2005:i:2:p265-283

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Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Salvatore Di Falco & Marcella Veronesi & Mahmud Yesuf, 2010. "Does adaptation to climate change provide food security?: a micro-perspective from Ethiopia," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 37592, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Di Falco, Salvatore & Veronesi, Marcella, 2012. "Managing Environmental Risk in Presence of Climate Change: The Role of Adaptation in the Nile basin of Ethiopia," 86th Annual Conference, April 16-18, 2012, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 134775, Agricultural Economics Society.
  3. Henrique Monteiro, 2010. "Residential Water Demand in Portugal: checking for efficiency-based justifications for increasing block tariffs," Working Papers Series 1 ercwp0110, ISCTE-IUL, Business Research Unit (BRU-IUL).
  4. Olivier Armantier & Scott Nelson & Giorgio Topa & Wilbert van der Klaauw & Basit Zafar, 2012. "The price is right: updating of inflation expectations in a randomized price information experiment," Staff Reports 543, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  5. Di Falco, Salvatore & Veronesi, Marcella, 2011. "On Adaptation To Climate Change And Risk Exposure In The Nile Basin Of Ethiopia," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 115549, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  6. Tobarra-González, Miguel Ángel, 2013. "Factores explicativos de la demanda municipal de agua y efectos en el bienestar de la política tarifaria. Una aplicación a la cuenca del Segura/Explicative Factors of Municipal Water Demand and Effe," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 577-596, Septiembr.
  7. Asfaw, Solomon & Shiferaw, Bekele & Simtowe, Franklin & Lipper, Leslie, 2012. "Impact of modern agricultural technologies on smallholder welfare: Evidence from Tanzania and Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 283-295.
  8. Kassie, Menale & Ndiritu, Simon Wagura & Stage, Jesper, 2014. "What Determines Gender Inequality in Household Food Security in Kenya? Application of Exogenous Switching Treatment Regression," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 153-171.
  9. Asfaw, Solomon & Shiferaw, Bekele A., 2010. "Agricultural Technology Adoption and Rural Poverty: Application of an Endogenous Switching Regression for Selected East African Countries," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 97049, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE) & Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
  10. Shiferaw, Bekele & Kassie, Menale & Jaleta, Moti & Yirga, Chilot, 2014. "Adoption of improved wheat varieties and impacts on household food security in Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 272-284.
  11. Di Falco, Salvatore & Veronesi, Marcella, 2012. "Managing Environmental Risk In Presence Of Climate Change: Evidence From Ethiopia," 126th Seminar, June 27-29, 2012, Capri, Italy 126010, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  12. Teklewold, Hailemariam & Kassie, Menale & Shiferaw, Bekele & Köhlin, Gunnar, 2013. "Cropping system diversification, conservation tillage and modern seed adoption in Ethiopia: Impacts on household income, agrochemical use and demand for labor," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 85-93.
  13. David R. Bell & Ronald C. Griffin, 2011. "Urban Water Demand with Periodic Error Correction," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(3), pages 528-544.

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