Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Turning on the Lights: A Meta-Analysis of Residential Electricity Demand Elasticities

Contents:

Author Info

  • Espey, James A.
  • Espey, Molly

Abstract

Meta-analysis us used to quantitatively summarize previous studies of residential electricity demand to determine if there are factors that systematically affect estimated elasticities. In this study, price and income elasticities of residential demand for electricity from previous studies are used as the dependent variables, with data characteristics, model structure, and estimation technique as independent variables, using both least square estimation of a semilog and maximum likelihood estimation of a gamma model. The findings of this research can help better inform public policy makers, regulators, and utilities about the responsiveness of residential electricity consumers to price and income changes.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/42897
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 36 (2004)
Issue (Month): 01 (April)
Pages:

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:42897

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.saea.org/jaae/jaae.htm
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: electricity demand; income elasticity; meta-analysis; price elasticity; residential electricity demand; Q40; Q41; D12;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Kokkelenberg, Edward C. & Mount, Timothy D., 1992. "Oil Shocks And The Demand For Electricity," Working Papers 128100, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  2. Jean-Thomas Bernard & Denis Bolduc & Donald Belanger, 1996. "Quebec Residential Electricity Demand: A Microeconometric Approach," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(1), pages 92-113, February.
  3. Murray, Michael P, et al, 1978. "The Demand for Electricity in Virginia," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(4), pages 585-600, November.
  4. Smith, V. Kerry, 1980. "Estimating the price elasticity of US electricity demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 81-85, April.
  5. Herriges, Joseph A & King, Kathleen Kuester, 1994. "Residential Demand for Electricity under Inverted Block Rates: Evidence from a Controlled Experiment," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(4), pages 419-30, October.
  6. Shin, Jeong-Shik, 1985. "Perception of Price When Price Information Is Costly: Evidence from Residential Electricity Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(4), pages 591-98, November.
  7. Barnes, Roberta & Gillingham, Robert & Hagemann, Robert, 1981. "The Short-run Residential Demand for Electricity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 63(4), pages 541-52, November.
  8. Espey, Molly, 1998. "Gasoline demand revisited: an international meta-analysis of elasticities," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 273-295, June.
  9. Garcia-Cerrutti, L. Miguel, 2000. "Estimating elasticities of residential energy demand from panel county data using dynamic random variables models with heteroskedastic and correlated error terms," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 355-366, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
This item has more than 25 citations. To prevent cluttering this page, these citations are listed on a separate page.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:42897. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.