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Labor Market Effects of September 11th on Arab and Muslim Residents of the United States

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Author Info

  • Neeraj Kaushal
  • Robert Kaestner
  • Cordelia Reimers

Abstract

We investigated whether the September 11, 2001 terrorists’ attacks had any effect on employment, earnings, and residential mobility of first- and second-generation Arab and Muslim men in the United States. We find that September 11th did not significantly affect employment and hours of work of Arab and Muslim men, but was associated with a 9-11 percent decline in their real wage and weekly earnings, with some evidence that this decline was temporary. The adverse earnings effects were strongly linked to hate crime incidence. Estimates also suggest that the terrorists’ attacks reduced intrastate migration of Arab and Muslim men.

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File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/XLII/2/275
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 42 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:42:y:2007:i2:p275-308

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Sami H. Miaari & Asaf Zussman & Noam Zussman, 2010. "Ethnic Conflict and Job Separations," HiCN Working Papers 76, Households in Conflict Network.
  2. Mahmood Arai & Moa Bursell & Lena Nekby, 2011. "The Reverse Gender Gap in Ethnic Discrimination: Employer Priors against Men and Women with Arabic Names," Working Papers CEB 11-027, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  3. García Muñoz, Teresa & Neuman, Shoshana, 2012. "Is Religiosity of Immigrants a Bridge or a Buffer in the Process of Integration? A Comparative Study of Europe and the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 6384, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Adida, Claire L. & Laitin, David D. & Valfort, Marie-Anne, 2011. ""One Muslim is Enough!" - Evidence from a Field Experiment in France," IZA Discussion Papers 6122, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Thomas Cornelissen & Uwe Jirjahn, 2010. "September 11th and the Earnings of Muslims in Germany - The Moderating Role of Education and Firm Size," Research Papers in Economics 2010-02, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
  6. Schüller, Simone, 2012. "The Effects of 9/11 on Attitudes Toward Immigration and the Moderating Role of Education," IZA Discussion Papers 7052, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Shannon, Michael, 2012. "Did the September 11th attacks affect the Canadian labour market?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 91-93.
  8. Grace Lordan & David Johnston, 2011. "Discrimination makes me Sick! Establishing a relationship between discrimination and health," Discussion Papers Series 421, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  9. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2009. "The effects of tougher enforcement on the job prospects of recent Latin American immigrants," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(2), pages 239-257.
  10. Esther Hauk & Hannes Mueller, 2010. "Cultural Leaders and the Clash of Civilizations," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 838.10, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  11. Vincent Law, 2011. "Is Reaction to Terrorist Attacks a Localised Phenomenon?," Crawford School Research Papers 1110, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  12. Faisal Rabby & William Rodgers, 2011. "Post 9-11 U.S. Muslim Labor Market Outcomes," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 39(3), pages 273-289, September.
  13. Nils Braakmann, 2007. "Islamistic Terror, the War on Iraq and the Job Prospects of Arab Men in Britain: Does a Country’s Direct Involvement Matter?," Working Paper Series in Economics 70, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
  14. Goel, Deepti, 2009. "Perceptions and Labor Market Outcomes of Immigrants in Australia after 9/11," IZA Discussion Papers 4356, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. Ryan Brown, 2014. "The Intergenerational Impact of Terror: Does the 9/11 Tragedy Reverberate into the Outcomes of the Next Generation?," HiCN Working Papers 165, Households in Conflict Network.
  16. Johnston, David W. & Lordan, Grace, 2012. "Discrimination makes me sick! An examination of the discrimination–health relationship," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 99-111.
  17. Chunbei Wang & Le Wang, 2012. "The effects of 9/11 on intermarriage between natives and immigrants to the U.S," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 171-192, June.
  18. Ashraf El-Araby Aly & James Ragan, 2010. "Arab immigrants in the United States: how and why do returns to education vary by country of origin?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 519-538, March.

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