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The Effect of Private Interests on Regulated Retail and Wholesale Prices

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  • Gregory L. Rosston
  • Scott J. Savage
  • Bradley S. Wimmer
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    Abstract

    This paper examines how regulators behave in markets when there is a tension between retail competition and cross subsidy. Using retail and wholesale prices from regional Bell operating company territories and price-cost margins as a proxy for political influence, we find that private interests influence the structure of retail prices, especially favoring rural residential customers. Political influence also extends to wholesale access prices, although the magnitude of its effect is small. Federal high-cost universal service payments to a state do not reduce prices in that state's rural areas but instead lower urban business prices. (c) 2008 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved..

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    File URL: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdf/10.1086/589671
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal The Journal of Law and Economics.

    Volume (Year): 51 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 3 (08)
    Pages: 479-501

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlawec:v:51:y:2008:i:3:p:479-501

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JLE/

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    Cited by:
    1. Nicholas Bloom & Renata Lemos & Raffaella Sadun & John Van Reenen, 2014. "Does Management Matter In Schools," Discussion Papers 13-032, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    2. Daniel Ackerberg & Michael Riordan & Gregory Rosston & Bradley Wimmer, 2008. "Low-Income Demand for Local Telephone Service: Effects of Lifeline and Linkup," Discussion Papers 07-032, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    3. Daniel A. Ackerberg & David R. DeRemer & Michael H. Riordan & Gregory L. Rosston & Bradley S. Wimmer, 2013. "Estimating the Impact of Low-Income Universal Service Programs," Discussion Papers 12-016, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    4. Jeffrey Macher & John Mayo, 2012. "The World of Regulatory Influence," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 59-79, February.
    5. PĂ©rez Montes, Carlos, 2013. "Regulatory bias in the price structure of local telephone service," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 462-476.

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