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Life-Cycle Effects on Consumption and Retirement

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  • Hamermesh, Daniel S

Abstract

The effects on consumption and retirement of characteristics of the life cycle, especially the length of the horizon, are examined. At any given age people will work more and consume less if they expect to live longer. This and other propositions are tested on several sets of data. The Terman sample of gifted individuals (320 in 1972, 228 in 1977) is used to relate work status to the length of the horizon, as proxied by parents' longevity. The results suggest the expected positive effect on effort, but its magnitude is quite small. The panel from the Retirement History Survey is used, and life-cycle effects on consumption and retirement are estimated jointly for 1973 and 1975. There is a weak small effect of a more distant horizon (proxied by the number of living parents) in increasing work effort and a stronger, but still fairly small effect in reducing consumption; goods and leisure are consumed jointly, suggesting their complementarity in household production; and spending propensities out of Social Security wealth are far below those out of pension wealth. The small effect of changes in the horizon on work effect suggests the rapid secular increase in longevity has produced a disproportionate increase in people's lifetime demand for leisure. The implied small increase in lifetime income and the slight reduction in consumption among persons with longer horizons indicate that increased longevity has not been met with sufficient spending cuts to enable people to maintain real consumption over their longer lifetimes.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 2 (1984)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 353-70

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:2:y:1984:i:3:p:353-70

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Cited by:
  1. Yamada, Tetsuji, 1990. "The effects of Japanese social security retirement benefits on personal saving and elderly labor force behavior," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 327-363, December.
  2. Manuel Flores & Melchor Fern√°ndez, 2011. "Age discrimination on wages as a determinant of older workers - labour participation in Spain (refereed paper)," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1176, European Regional Science Association.
  3. Susan Pozo & Stephen A. Woodbury, . "Pensions, Social Security, and Asset Accumulation," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles spsaw1985, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  4. Anders, Sven, 2010. "Ageing And Consumption – The Impact Of Demographic Change On Food Expenditure Patterns," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116442, European Association of Agricultural Economists & Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  5. Michael Hurd & Susann Rohwedder, 2004. "The Retirement-Consumption Puzzle: Anticipated and Actual Declines in Spending at Retirement," Working Papers wp069, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  6. Michael Perry, 2005. "Estimating Life Cycle Effects of Survival Probabilities in the Health and Retirement Study," Working Papers wp103, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  7. Owen O'Donnell & Federica Teppa & Eddy van Doorslaer, 2008. "Can subjective survival expectations explain retirement behaviour?," DNB Working Papers 188, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  8. Pecchenino, Rowena A & Pollard, Patricia S, 1997. "The Effects of Annuities, Bequests, and Aging in an Overlapping Generations Model of Endogenous Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 26-46, January.
  9. Anton Nivorozhkin & Ludmila Nivorozhkina & Kamila Abazieva, 2013. "Expenditures and Income Adequacy at Retirement," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 2017-2023.
  10. Gensowski, Miriam, 2014. "Personality, IQ, and Lifetime Earnings," IZA Discussion Papers 8235, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Olivia S. Mitchell, 1982. "The Labor Market Impact of Federal Regulation: OSHA, ERISA, EEO, and Minimum Wage," NBER Working Papers 0844, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Nivorozhkina, Ludmila & Nivorozhkin, Anton & Abazieva, Kamilla, 2010. "Drop in consumption associated with retirement. The regression discontinuity design approach," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 19(3), pages 112-126.
  13. Rainer Winkelmann, 2002. "Subjektive Daten in der empirischen Wirtschaftsforschung: Probleme und Perspektiven," SOI - Working Papers 0207, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich, revised Jul 2002.
  14. Tetsuji Yamada & Tadashi Yamada, 1987. "Social Security and Earlier Retirement in Japan: Cross-Sectional Evidence," NBER Working Papers 2442, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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