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The natalist bias of pollution control

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  • DE LA CROIX, David

    ()
    (Université catholique de Louvain, CORE and IRES, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)

  • GOSSERIES, Axel

    ()
    (Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Belgium) and Hoover Chair, UCLouvain, Belgium)

Abstract

For a given technology, two ways are available to achieve low polluting emissions: reducing production per capita or reducing population size. This paper insists on the tension between the former and the latter. Controlling pollution either through Pigovian taxes or through tradable quotas schemes encourages agents to shift away from production to tax free activities such as procreation and leisure. This natalist bias will deteriorate the environment further, entailing the need to impose ever more stringent pollution rights per person. However, this will in turn gradually impoverish the successive generations: population will tend to increase further and production per capita to decrease as the generations pass. One possible solution consists in capping population too.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) in its series CORE Discussion Papers with number 2011027.

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Date of creation: 01 Jun 2011
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Handle: RePEc:cor:louvco:2011027

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Related research

Keywords: overlapping generations; environmental policy; endogenous fertility; quantity - quality tradeoff; population control;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. DEVOLDER, Olivier, 2011. "Stochastic first order methods in smooth convex optimization," CORE Discussion Papers 2011070, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  2. DAO, Nguyen-Thang & DAVILA, Julio, 2013. "Can geography lock a society in stagnation?," CORE Discussion Papers 2013030, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  3. Emeline Bezin, 2013. "The dynamics of environmental concern and the evolution of pollution," Working Papers SMART - LERECO 13-09, INRA UMR SMART.

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