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Women’s College Decisions: How Much Does Marriage Matter?

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  • Suqin Ge
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Abstract

This article investigates the sequential college attendance decision of young women and quantifies the effect of marriage expectations on their decision to attend and graduate from college. A dynamic choice model of college attendance, labor supply, and marriage is formulated and structurally estimated using panel data from the NLSY79. The model is used to simulate the effects of no marriage benefits and finds that the predicted college enrollment rate will drop from 58.0% to 50.5%. Using the estimated model, the college attendance behavior for a younger cohort from the NLSY97 is predicted and used to validate the behavioral model.

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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.1086/660774
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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/660774
Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 29 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 773 - 818

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/660774

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Cited by:
  1. Alena Bičáková & Štěpán Jurajda, 2014. "The Quiet Revolution and the Family: Gender Composition of Tertiary Education and Early Fertility Patterns," Discussion Papers 22, Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).
  2. Martha J. Bailey & Brad Hershbein & Amalia R. Miller, 2012. "The Opt-In Revolution? Contraception and the Gender Gap in Wages," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 225-54, July.
  3. Matthew Wiswall & Basit Zafar, 2011. "Determinants of college major choice: identification using an information experiment," Staff Reports 500, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Fang (Annie) Yang & Suqin Ge, 2008. "Accounting for the Gender Gap in College Attainment," Discussion Papers 08-02, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
  5. Raquel Fernández & Joyce C. Wong, 2014. "Divorce Risk, Wages, and Working Wives: A Quantitative Life-Cycle Analysis of Female Labor Force Participation," NBER Working Papers 19869, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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