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The Labor Market Impacts of Youth Training in the Dominican Republic

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Author Info

  • David Card
  • Pablo Ibarrar�n
  • Ferdinando Regalia
  • David Rosas-Shady
  • Yuri Soares

Abstract

We report the impacts of a job training program operated in the Dominican Republic. A random sample of applicants was selected to undergo training, and information was gathered 10–14 months after graduation. Unfortunately, people originally assigned to treatment who failed to show up were not included in the follow-up survey, potentially compromising the evaluation design. We present estimates of the program effect, including comparisons that ignore the potential nonrandomness of “no-show” behavior, and estimates that model selectivity parametrically. We find little indication of a positive effect on employment outcomes but some evidence of a modest effect on earnings, conditional on working.

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File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/full/10.1086/658090
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 29 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 267 - 300

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:doi:10.1086/658090

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Zuzana Brixiova & Mthuli Ncube & Zorobabel Bicaba, 2014. "Skills and youth entrepreneurship in Africa: Analysis with evidence from Swaziland," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1077, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  2. Barrientos, Armando & Villa, Juan M., 2013. "Evaluating antipoverty transfer programmes in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa: Better policies? Better politics?," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  3. Ibarrarán, Pablo & Ripani, Laura & Taboada, Bibiana & Villa, Juan Miguel & García, Brígida, 2012. "Life Skills, Employability and Training for Disadvantaged Youth: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation Design," IZA Discussion Papers 6617, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. World Bank, 2012. "Toward Gender Equality in East Asia and the Pacific : A Companion to the World Development Report," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12598.
  5. Umidjon Abdullaev & Marcello Estevao, 2013. "Growth and Employment in the Dominican Republic," IMF Working Papers 13/40, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Carla Calero & Veronica Gonzales & Yuri Soares & Jochen Kluve & Carlos Henrique Corseuilt, 2014. "Can Arts-Based Interventions Enhance Labor Market Outcomes among Youth? Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Rio de Janeiro," Ruhr Economic Papers 0486, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  7. Biavaschi, Costanza & Eichhorst, Werner & Giulietti, Corrado & Kendzia, Michael J. & Muravyev, Alexander & Pieters, Janneke & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria & Schmidl, Ricarda & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2012. "Youth Unemployment and Vocational Training," IZA Discussion Papers 6890, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Cho, Yoonyoung & Kalomba, Davie & Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq & Orozco, Victor, 2013. "Gender differences in the effects of vocational training : constraints on women and drop-out behavior," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6545, The World Bank.
  9. Dasgupta, Utteeyo & Gangadharan, Lata & Maitra, Pushkar & Mani, Subha & Subramanian, Samyukta, 2011. "Selection into skill accumulation: evidence using observational and experimental data," MPRA Paper 32383, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. David Cutler & Wei Huang & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2014. "When Does Education Matter? The Protective Effect of Education for Cohorts Graduating in Bad Times," NBER Working Papers 20156, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Evelyn Vezza, 2014. "Escaneo de Políticas y Meta-Análisis: Juventud y Políticas de Empleo en América Latina (Policy scan and meta-analysis: Youth and Employment policies in Latin America)," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0156, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  12. Pugatch, Todd, 2012. "Safety Valve or Sinkhole? Vocational Schooling in South Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 7015, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Oriana Bandiera & Niklas Buehren & Robin Burgess & Markus Goldstein & Selim Gulesci & Imran Rasul & Munshi Sulaiman, 2014. "Women’s Empowerment in Action: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial in Africa," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 50, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.

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