Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Exit in Developing Countries: Economic Reforms and Plant Heterogeneity

Contents:

Author Info

  • Roberto Álvarez
  • Sebastián Vergara

Abstract

Several studies have found that plant turnover contributes to productivity growth. This evidence seems to be consistent with the idea that by reducing protection granted to inefficient firms, economic liberalization would generate productivity gains associated with resource reallocation from less productive to more productive firms. However, little empirical work has been done directly linking economic liberalization and plant exit. This article uses Chilean reforms to shed light on their effects on plant exit. Our econometric analysis shows that larger and more productive plants are less likely to exit. After controlling for these characteristics, we also find that exit is more likely in export-oriented industries. Moreover, we find a differential impact of economic liberalization and exchange rate fluctuations. Changes in these variables have a more significant impact on less productive and smaller plants. By industry, we find that more affected plants are those in export-oriented sectors. (c) 2010 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved..

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdf/10.1086/650422
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 58 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (04)
Pages: 537-561

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:58:y:2010:i:3:p:537-561

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Eslava, Marcela & Haltiwanger, John & Kugler, Adriana & Kugler, Maurice, 2004. "The effects of structural reforms on productivity and profitabality enhancing reallocation: evidence from Colombia," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0408, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
  2. Andrew B. Bernard & J. Bradford Jensen, 2001. "Who Dies? International Trade, Market Structure, and Industrial Restructuring," NBER Working Papers 8327, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Philippe Aghion & Richard Blundell & Rachel Griffith & Peter Howitt & Susanne Prantl, 2004. "Entry and Productivity Growth: Evidence from Microlevel Panel Data," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 265-276, 04/05.
  4. Hopenhayn, Hugo A, 1992. "Entry, Exit, and Firm Dynamics in Long Run Equilibrium," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(5), pages 1127-50, September.
  5. Geroski, P. A., 1995. "What do we know about entry?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 421-440, December.
  6. James Levinsohn & Amil Petrin, 2000. "Estimating Production Functions Using Inputs to Control for Unobservables," NBER Working Papers 7819, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Amil Petrin & Brian P. Poi & James Levinsohn, 2004. "Production function estimation in Stata using inputs to control for unobservables," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(2), pages 113-123, June.
  8. Nina Pavcnik, 2000. "Trade Liberalization, Exit, and Productivity Improvements: Evidence from Chilean Plants," NBER Working Papers 7852, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. James Levinsohn & Amil Petrin, 2003. "Estimating Production Functions Using Inputs to Control for Unobservables," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(2), pages 317-341.
  10. Gibson,J.K. & Harris,R.I.D., 1996. "Trade Liberalisation and Plant Exit in New Zealand Manufacturing," Papers 66, Portsmouth University - Department of Economics.
  11. Head, Keith & Ries, John, 1999. "Rationalization effects of tariff reductions," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 295-320, April.
  12. Fernandes, Ana M., 2007. "Trade policy, trade volumes and plant-level productivity in Colombian manufacturing industries," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 52-71, March.
  13. Jen Baggs, 2005. "Firm survival and exit in response to trade liberalization," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(4), pages 1364-1383, November.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Aldaba, Rafaelita M., 2012. "Surviving Trade Liberalization in Philippine Manufacturing," Discussion Papers DP 2012-10, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
  2. Fernandes, Ana M. & Paunov, Caroline, 2012. "The risks of innovation : are innovating firms less likely to die ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6103, The World Bank.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:58:y:2010:i:3:p:537-561. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.