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Too Young to Leave the Nest? The Effects of School Starting Age

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  • Sandra E. Black

    (Department of Economics, UCLA, IZA, and NBER)

  • Paul J. Devereux

    (School of Economics and Geary Institute, University College Dublin, CEPR, and IZA)

  • Kjell G. Salvanes

    (Department of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics, Center for the Economics of Education, and IZA)

Abstract

Using Norwegian data, we examine effects of school starting age (SSA). Unlike much recent literature, we can separate SSA from test age effects using scores from IQ tests taken outside school at about age 18. We find a small, negative effect of starting school older but much larger positive effects of age at test. Also, starting older leads to lower earnings until about age 30. We find little impact of SSA on educational attainment, but boys who start older are less likely to have poor mental health at age 18. Additionally, starting school older has a negative effect on the probability of teenage pregnancy. © 2011 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal The Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 93 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 455-467

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:93:y:2011:i:2:p:455-467

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  1. Todd E. Elder & Darren H. Lubotsky, 2009. "Kindergarten Entrance Age and Children’s Achievement: Impacts of State Policies, Family Background, and Peers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(3).
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  6. Angrist, Joshua D & Krueger, Alan B, 1991. "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling and Earnings?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 106(4), pages 979-1014, November.
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  13. Fredriksson, Peter & Öckert, Björn, 2006. "Is early learning really more productive? The effect of school starting age on school and labor market performance," Working Paper Series, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy 2006:12, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  14. SandraE. Black & PaulJ. Devereux & KjellG. Salvanes, 2008. "Staying in the Classroom and out of the maternity ward? The effect of compulsory schooling laws on teenage births," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(530), pages 1025-1054, 07.
  15. Fertig, Michael & Kluve, Jochen, 2005. "The Effect of Age at School Entry on Educational Attainment in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 1507, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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