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When You Are Born Matters: The Imapct of Date of Birth on Child Cognitive Outcomes in England

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Author Info

  • Claire Crawford
  • Lorraine Dearden
  • Costas Meghir

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File URL: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/ceedps/ceedp93.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE in its series CEE Discussion Papers with number 0093.

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Date of creation: Oct 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cep:ceedps:0093

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Web page: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/publications.htm

Related research

Keywords: Birth effects; birth penalties; school start dates; cognitive outcomes;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

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  1. Puhani, Patrick A. & Weber, Andrea M., 2005. "Does the Early Bird Catch the Worm? Instrumental Variable Estimates of Educational Effects of Age of School Entry in Germany," Darmstadt Discussion Papers in Economics 25840, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute of Economics (VWL).
  2. Kelly Bedard & Elizabeth Dhuey, 2006. "The Persistence of Early Childhood Maturity: International Evidence of Long-Run Age Effects," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 121(4), pages 1437-1472, November.
  3. Lorraine Dearden & Leslie McGranahan & Barbara Sianesi, 2004. "An In-Depth Analysis of the Returns to National Vocational Qualifications Obtained at level 2," CEE Discussion Papers 0046, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
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Cited by:
  1. Elizabeth Dhuey & Stephen Lipscomb, 2010. "Disabled or Young? Relative Age and Special Education Diagnoses in Schools," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 6738, Mathematica Policy Research.
  2. Braakmann, Nils, 2011. "The causal relationship between education, health and health related behaviour: Evidence from a natural experiment in England," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 753-763, July.
  3. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J. & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2008. "Too Young to Leave the Nest? The Effects of School Starting Age," IZA Discussion Papers 3452, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Oscar Marcenaro & Muriel Meunier & Augustin de Coulon & Anna Vignoles, 2010. "A longitudinal analysis of second-generation disadvantaged immigrants," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2010/02, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
  5. Mitesh Kataria & Natalia Montinari, 2012. "Risk, Entitlements and Fairness Bias: Explaining Preferences for Redistribution in Multi-person Setting," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-061, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.
  6. Dustmann, Christian & Puhani, Patrick A. & Schönberg, Uta, 2014. "The Long-Term Effects of Early Track Choice," IZA Discussion Papers 7897, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Billari, Francesco C. & Pellizzari, Michele, 2008. "The Younger, the Better? Relative Age Effects at University," IZA Discussion Papers 3795, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Ian Walker & Yu Zhu, 2009. "The Causal Effect of Teen Motherhood on Worklessness," Studies in Economics 0917, Department of Economics, University of Kent.

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