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Self-employment earnings and returns to education in rural Peru

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  • Sonia Laszlo

Abstract

This article estimates the returns to education for households who derive part of their income from household based non-farm self-employment ventures in rural Peru. While education is an individual level variable, earnings are observed at the household level. This asymmetry complicates both the estimation and the interpretation of the returns to education. This article is the first jointly to incorporate three channels through which education affects household earnings. Education affects earnings through the marginal productivity of labour (worker effect), labour allocation across activities (between-activity allocative effect) and its production externality effect (spillover effect). The results suggest that the between-activity allocative effects of education dominate the returns. This article also makes novel use of economic geography to proxy for the role that access to markets plays in determining these returns. In particular, altitude is a strong predictor of activity choice and the returns to education in this mountainous country.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00220380500170915
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Development Studies.

Volume (Year): 41 (2005)
Issue (Month): 7 ()
Pages: 1247-1287

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:41:y:2005:i:7:p:1247-1287

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  1. Barton H. Hamilton, 2000. "Does Entrepreneurship Pay? An Empirical Analysis of the Returns to Self-Employment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(3), pages 604-631, June.
  2. Yang, Dennis T., 1995. "Education in Production: Measuring Labor Quality and Management," Working Papers 95-56, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  3. Chiappori, Pierre-Andre & Haddad, Lawrence & Hoddinott, John & Kanbur, Ravi, 1993. "Unitary versus collective models of the household : time to shift theburden of proof?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1217, The World Bank.
  4. Chao, John & Swanson, Norman R., 2007. "Alternative approximations of the bias and MSE of the IV estimator under weak identification with an application to bias correction," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 137(2), pages 515-555, April.
  5. Mwangi S. Kimenyi & Germano Mwabu & Damiano Kulundu Manda, 2006. "Human Capital Externalities and Private Returns to Education in Kenya," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 493-513, Summer.
  6. Vijverberg, Wim P. M., 1995. "Returns to schooling in non-farm self-employment: An econometric case study of Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(7), pages 1215-1227, July.
  7. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-46, September.
  8. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
  9. Evans, David S & Jovanovic, Boyan, 1989. "An Estimated Model of Entrepreneurial Choice under Liquidity Constraints," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 808-27, August.
  10. Alberto Isgut, 2004. "Non-farm Income and Employment in Rural Honduras: Assessing the Role of Locational Factors," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(3), pages 59-86.
  11. Alderman, Harold, et al, 1995. "Unitary versus Collective Models of the Household: Is It Time to Shift the Burden of Proof?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 10(1), pages 1-19, February.
  12. Basu, Kaushik & Narayan, Ambar & Ravallion, Martin, 2001. "Is literacy shared within households? Theory and evidence for Bangladesh," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(6), pages 649-665, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Erik Jonasson & Steven M Helfand, 2008. "Locational Determinants of Rural Non-agricultural Employment: Evidence From Brazil," Working Papers 200802, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2008.
  2. Jonasson, Erik & Helfand, Steven M., 2010. "How Important are Locational Characteristics for Rural Non-agricultural Employment? Lessons from Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 727-741, May.

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