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Of Markets And Martyrs: Is It OK To Pay Well For Care?

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  • Julie Nelson

Abstract

If caring work were well paid, would it lose some of the special, emotional, interpersonal aspects we want in "real" care relationships? Some fear that the introduction of "market values" would lead to such an outcome. This article seeks to bring to light some logical fallacies and insufficiently expunged gender dualisms that may lie, unexamined, under such concerns. Examining the ways we think and talk about markets, meanings, and motivations, it argues that the foci of feminist concern should instead be the concrete structures of caregiving and the problem of under-demand.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Feminist Economics.

Volume (Year): 5 (1999)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 43-59

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Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:5:y:1999:i:3:p:43-59

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Related research

Keywords: Caring; Labor; Wages; Dualism; Markets; Commodification;

References

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  1. Nelson, J.A., 1990. "Gender, Metaphor, And The Definition Of Economics," Papers 350, California Davis - Institute of Governmental Affairs.
  2. Becker, Gary S, 1985. "Human Capital, Effort, and the Sexual Division of Labor," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages S33-58, January.
  3. Deirdre McCloskey, 1996. "Love and money: A comment on the markets debate," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 137-140.
  4. Peter Dorman & Nancy Folbre & Donald McCloskey & Tom Weisskopf, 1996. "Debating markets," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 69-85.
  5. Myra Strober & Suzanne Gerlach-Downie & Kenneth Yeager, 1995. "Child care centers as workplaces," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 93-119.
  6. Nancy Folbre, 1995. ""Holding hands at midnight": The paradox of caring labor," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 73-92.
  7. George B. Roberts, Chairman, Universities-National Bureau Committee for Economic Research, 1960. "Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number univ60-2, octubre-d.
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Cited by:
  1. van Staveren, I.P., 2005. "Five methodological approaches for research on gender and trade impacts," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19176, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  2. Heyes, Anthony, 2005. "The economics of vocation or 'why is a badly paid nurse a good nurse'?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 561-569, May.
  3. Antigone Lyberaki, 2008. "“Deae ex Machina”: migrant women, care work and women’s employment in Greece," GreeSE – Hellenic Observatory Papers on Greece and Southeast Europe 20, Hellenic Observatory, LSE.
  4. Antigone Lyberaki, 2008. "“Deae ex Machina”: migrant women, care work and women’s employment in Greece," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 23183, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. Julie A. Nelson, . "05-04 "Rationality and Humanity: A View from Feminist Economics"," GDAE Working Papers 05-04, GDAE, Tufts University.
  6. Eileen Trzcinski & Elke Holst, 2011. "A Critique and Reframing of Personality in Labour Market Theory: Locus of Control and Labour Market Outcomes," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 403, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  7. Nancy Folbre & Julie A. Nelson, 2000. "For Love or Money--Or Both?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 123-140, Fall.

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