Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Expanding Economic Costing in Health Care: Values, Gender and Diversity

Contents:

Author Info

  • Olena Hankivsk
  • Jane Friesen
  • Colleen Varcoe
  • Fiona MacPhail
  • Lorraine Greaves
  • Charmaine Spencer
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    In this paper we offer a normative analysis of economic evaluations by critically examining Canadian social values in relation to health, and contrasting these with the inherent values, methodological assumptions and pragmatic policy consequences of conventional cost of illness (COI) models. Through this analysis we reveal the value biases and resulting limitations of existing COI approaches, and propose an expanded framework for estimating costs that takes into account gender and diversity. This proposed framework builds upon fundamental shifts in values discourse emerging in the fields of economics, ethics, social policy, and feminist theory. Specifically, we demonstrate the implications of these cross-disciplinary convergences for COI studies. The analysis and framework provide arguments for why and how traditional costing methodologies need to be transformed to realize their full potential for informing health policy decisions. The paper reflects the work of a multidisciplinary group of researchers from the fields of economics, political science, sociology, and nursing.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0317-0861%28200409%2930%3A3%3C257%3AEECIHC%3E2.0.CO%3B2-F
    Download Restriction: only available to JSTOR subscribers

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Toronto Press in its journal Canadian Public Policy.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 257-282

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:30:y:2004:i:3:p:257-282

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: University of Toronto Press Journals Division 5201 Dufferin Street Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3H 5T8
    Email:
    Web page: http://economics.ca/cpp/

    Order Information:
    Email:
    Web: http://www.utpjournals.com/cpp/

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Elise Golan & Fred Kuchler, 1999. "Willingness to Pay for Food Safety: Costs and Benefits of Accurate Measures," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1185-1191.
    2. Sethi, Rajiv & Somanathan, E, 1996. "The Evolution of Social Norms in Common Property Resource Use," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 766-88, September.
    3. Lundberg, Shelly & Pollak, Robert A, 1994. "Noncooperative Bargaining Models of Marriage," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 132-37, May.
    4. Chiappori, Pierre-Andre, 1992. "Collective Labor Supply and Welfare," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(3), pages 437-67, June.
    5. Phipps, S.A. & Burton, P.S., 1992. "What's Mine is Yours?: The Influence of Male and Female Incomes on Patterns of Household Expenditure," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive, Dalhousie, Department of Economics 92-12, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    6. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
    7. Peter A. Ubel & Jeff Richardson & Paul Menzel, 2000. "Societal value, the person trade-off, and the dilemma of whose values to measure for cost-effectiveness analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(2), pages 127-136.
    8. Sandra Harding, 1995. "Can feminist thought make economics more objective?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 7-32.
    9. Werner B.F. Brouwer & Marc A. Koopmanschap, 1998. "How to Calculate Indirect Costs in Economic Evaluations," PharmacoEconomics, Springer Healthcare | Adis, Springer Healthcare | Adis, vol. 13(5), pages 563-569.
    10. Nancy Folbre, 1995. ""Holding hands at midnight": The paradox of caring labor," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 73-92.
    11. Fuchs, Victor R., 2000. "The future of health economics1," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 141-157, March.
    12. Jochimsen, Maren & Knobloch, Ulrike, 1997. "Making the hidden visible: the importance of caring activities and their principles for any economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 107-112, February.
    13. Julie A. Nelson, 1995. "Feminism and Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 131-148, Spring.
    14. Drucilla Barker, 1995. "Economists, social reformers, and prophets: a feminist critique of economic efficiency," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(3), pages 26-39.
    15. Behrens, Cornelia & Henke, Klaus-Dirk, 1988. "Cost of illness studies: no aid to decision making? Reply to Shiell et al. (Health Policy, 8 (1987) 317-323)," Health Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 137-141, October.
    16. Shoup, Donald, 2002. "Roughly Right or Precisely Wrong," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2x8639t7, University of California Transportation Center.
    17. Marc A. Koopmanschap, 1998. "Cost-of-Illness Studies: Useful for Health Policy?," PharmacoEconomics, Springer Healthcare | Adis, Springer Healthcare | Adis, vol. 14(2), pages 143-148.
    18. Hoffman, Elizabeth & McCabe, Kevin A & Smith, Vernon L, 1998. "Behavioral Foundations of Reciprocity: Experimental Economics and Evolutionary Psychology," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(3), pages 335-52, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:30:y:2004:i:3:p:257-282. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Prof. Werner Antweiler).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.