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A model of speculative behaviour with a strange attractor

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  • Fernando Fernandez-Rodriguez
  • Maria-Dolores Garcia-Artiles
  • Juan Manuel Martin-Gonzalez
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    Abstract

    An asset pricing model for a speculative financial market with fundamentalists and chartists is analysed. The model explains bursts of volatility in financial markets, which are not well explained by the traditional finance paradigms. Speculative bubbles arise as a complex non-linear dynamic phenomenon brought about naturally by the dynamic interaction of heterogeneous market participants. Depending on the time lag in the formation of chartists' expectations, the system evolves through several dynamic regimes, finishing in a strange attractor. Chaos provides a self-sustained motion around the rationally expected equilibrium that corresponds to a speculative bubble. In order to explain the role of Chartism, chaotic motion is a very interesting theoretical feature for a speculative financial market model. It provides a complex non-linear dynamic behaviour around the Walrasian equilibrium price produced by deterministic interactions between fundamentalists and chartists. This model could be a link between two opposite views over the behaviour of financial markets: the theorist's literature view that claims the random motion of asset prices, and the chartist's position extensively adopted by market professionals.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504860210159032
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Mathematical Finance.

    Volume (Year): 9 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 143-161

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:apmtfi:v:9:y:2002:i:3:p:143-161

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    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAMF20

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    Related research

    Keywords: Bubbles; Technical Analysis; Charting; Market Speculation; Deterministic Chaos;

    References

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    1. Beja, Avraham & Goldman, M Barry, 1980. " On the Dynamic Behavior of Prices in Disequilibrium," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 35(2), pages 235-48, May.
    2. William A. Brock & Cars H. Hommes, 1997. "A Rational Route to Randomness," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(5), pages 1059-1096, September.
    3. Campbell, J.Y. & Shiller, R.J., 1988. "Stock Prices, Earnings And Expected Dividends," Papers 334, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program.
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    5. Taylor, John B, 1977. "Conditions for Unique Solutions in Stochastic Macroeconomic Models with Rational Expectations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(6), pages 1377-85, September.
    6. Tirole, Jean, 1985. "Asset Bubbles and Overlapping Generations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1499-1528, November.
    7. Timmermann, Allan G, 1993. "How Learning in Financial Markets Generates Excess Volatility and Predictability in Stock Prices," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(4), pages 1135-45, November.
    8. Day, R. & Huang, W., 1988. "Bulls, Bears And Market Sheep," Papers m8822, Southern California - Department of Economics.
    9. Poterba, James M. & Summers, Lawrence H., 1988. "Mean reversion in stock prices : Evidence and Implications," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 27-59, October.
    10. Flood, Robert P & Garber, Peter M, 1980. "Market Fundamentals versus Price-Level Bubbles: The First Tests," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(4), pages 745-70, August.
    11. Robert J. Shiller, 1980. "Do Stock Prices Move Too Much to be Justified by Subsequent Changes in Dividends?," NBER Working Papers 0456, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Zeeman, E. C., 1974. "On the unstable behaviour of stock exchanges," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 39-49, March.
    13. Carl Chiarella, 1992. "The Dynamics of Speculative Behaviour," Working Paper Series 13, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    14. Fama, Eugene F & French, Kenneth R, 1988. "Permanent and Temporary Components of Stock Prices," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(2), pages 246-73, April.
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    Cited by:
    1. Carl Chiarella & Roberto Dieci & Xue-Zhong He, 2005. "Heterogeneous Expectations and Speculative Behaviour in a Dynamic Multi-Asset Framework," Research Paper Series 166, Quantitative Finance Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney.

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