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Gender patterns in Vietnam’s child mortality

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  • Thong Pham
  • Peter Kooreman

    ()

  • Ruud Koning
  • Doede Wiersma

Abstract

We analyze child mortality in Vietnam focusing on gender aspects. Contrary to several other countries in the region, mortality rates for boys are substantially larger than for girls. The mortality rate of boys appears to be more sensitive to parents’ education levels than the mortality rate of girls. A high education level of the father is particularly protective for boys. The rural–urban mortality difference in the raw data, which is particularly large for boys, can be fully explained by differences in observable characteristics of urban and rural households. Copyright The Author(s) 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-012-0425-9
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 26 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 303-322

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:26:y:2013:i:1:p:303-322

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Related research

Keywords: Child mortality; Gender differences; Hazard rate; Frailty model; C13; C31; C35; C41; I12;

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References

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  1. Bas van der Klaauw & Limin Wang, 2005. "Child Mortality In Rural India," Working Papers id:136, eSocialSciences.
  2. James Vaupel & Kenneth Manton & Eric Stallard, 1979. "The impact of heterogeneity in individual frailty on the dynamics of mortality," Demography, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 439-454, August.
  3. Roberto G. Gutierrez, 2002. "Parametric frailty and shared frailty survival models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(1), pages 22-44, February.
  4. Guilkey, David K. & Riphahn, Regina T., 1998. "The determinants of child mortality in the Philippines: estimation of a structural model," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 281-305, August.
  5. Gerald Makepeace & Sarmistha Pal, 2006. "Understanding the Effects of Siblings on Child Mortality: Evidence from India," Economics and Finance Discussion Papers 06-24, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
  6. Rubiana Chamarbagwala, 2011. "Sibling composition and selective gender-based survival bias," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 935-955, July.
  7. O'Donnell, Owen & Nicolás, Ángel López & Van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2009. "Growing richer and taller: Explaining change in the distribution of child nutritional status during Vietnam's economic boom," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 45-58, January.
  8. Horton, Susan, 1988. "Birth Order and Child Nutritional Status: Evidence from the Philippines," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(2), pages 341-54, January.
  9. M. Merli, 1998. "Mortality in Vietnam, 1979–1989," Demography, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 345-360, August.
  10. Roberto G. Gutierrez & Shana Carter & David M. Drukker, 2001. "On boundary-value likelihood-ratio tests," Stata Technical Bulletin, StataCorp LP, vol. 10(60).
  11. Cebu Study Team, 1992. "A child health production function estimated from longitudinal data," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 323-351, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Nandita Saikia & Abhishek Singh & Domantas Jasilionis & Faujdar Ram, 2013. "Explaining the rural-urban gap in infant mortality in India," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(18), pages 473-506, September.

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