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Farmers’ willingness to pay for community integrated pest management training in Nepal

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  • Kishor Atreya

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    Abstract

    The concept of community integrated pest management (IPM), which is well developed in Indonesia and Vietnam, was recently introduced in Nepal. However, it has not been widely practiced, due mainly to lack of financial and technical support. This study determined an individual’s willingness to pay (WTP) for community IPM training. Determinants of WTP were identified; and sample average estimates, opportunity costs of training, and probability values were used to estimate WTP for a group of households. Estimated WTP revealed that individuals were in favor of community IPM, hence it could be implemented with the support of local villagers. Community IPM demand functions showed that individuals’ knowledge and awareness of pesticide pollution are crucial for implementation. The annual welfare gained by providing five days community IPM training was calculated to be US $25.23 per household. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10460-007-9063-3
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Agriculture and Human Values.

    Volume (Year): 24 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 399-409

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:24:y:2007:i:3:p:399-409

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/10460

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    Related research

    Keywords: Community IPM; Nepal; Pesticide pollution; Willingness to pay;

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    1. Cuyno, Leah C. M. & Norton, George W. & Rola, Agnes, 2001. "Economic analysis of environmental benefits of integrated pest management: a Philippine case study," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(2-3), pages 227-233, September.
    2. Wiebers, U.C., 1993. "Integrated Pest Management and Pesticide Regulation in Developing Asia," Papers 211, World Bank - Technical Papers.
    3. Maumbe, Blessing M. & Swinton, Scott M., 2003. "Hidden health costs of pesticide use in Zimbabwe's smallholder cotton growers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 57(9), pages 1559-1571, November.
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    7. Mahmoud, Chowdhury & Shively, Gerald, 2004. "Agricultural diversification and integrated pest management in Bangladesh," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 30(3), pages 187-194, May.
    8. Wilson, Clevo, 2002. "Empirical Evidence Showing The Relationships Between Three Approaches For Pollution Control," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 48952, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    9. Sandra Brown & George Kennedy, 2005. "A case study of cash cropping in Nepal: Poverty alleviation or inequity?," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 105-116, 03.
    10. Pretty, J. N. & Brett, C. & Gee, D. & Hine, R. E. & Mason, C. F. & Morison, J. I. L. & Raven, H. & Rayment, M. D. & van der Bijl, G., 2000. "An assessment of the total external costs of UK agriculture," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 113-136, August.
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