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Malaria and agriculture: A global review of the literature with a focus on the application of integrated pest and vector management in East Africa and Uganda

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  • Wielgosz, Benjamin
  • Mangheni, Margaret Najjingo
  • Tsegai, Daniel
  • Ringler, Claudia

Abstract

Malaria is one of the top five causes of death worldwide, and roughly half the world’s population lives at risk of the disease. This health problem disproportionately affects the poor, particularly those in Africa south of the Sahara, where the disease is widespread. Many of those most afflicted are part of farming households; therefore agriculture, poverty, and health are intimately linked through malaria. Uganda has the highest malaria parasite transmission in the world and is an important case study due to the role agricultural development has played in increasing malaria transmission within the country, according to the literature reviewed here. This review brings together current research from agricultural economics, environmental science, and epidemiology to provide a foundation for research directly addressing how malaria relates these fields to one another in malaria-endemic settings such as the East African highlands. While each field has addressed malaria within existing academic frameworks, this literature review should support further interdisciplinary research by providing a detailed and well-documented account of integrative work on malaria to date.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 1232.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1232

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Keywords: Malaria; Agriculture; Health; Ecology; Integrated pest control; pesticides; Farmer field schools; Extension;

References

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  1. van der Hoek, W. & Sakthivadivel, R. & Renshaw, M. & Silver, J. B. & Birley, M. H. & Konradsen, F., 2001. "Alternate wet/dry irrigation in rice cultivation: a practical way to save water and control malaria and Japanese encephalitis?," IWMI Books, Reports H027579, International Water Management Institute.
  2. Douglas Gollin & Christian Zimmermann, 2005. "Malaria," 2005 Meeting Papers 561, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Wetzstein, Michael E. & Musser, Wesley N. & Linder, David K. & Douce, G. Keith, 1985. "An Evaluation Of Integrated Pest Management With Heterogeneous Participation," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 10(02), December.
  4. Asenso-Okyere, Kwadwo & Asante, Felix A. & Tarekegn, Jifar & Andam, Kwaw S., 2009. "The linkages between agriculture and malaria: Issues for policy, research, and capacity strengthening," IFPRI discussion papers 861, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Chima, Reginald Ikechukwu & Goodman, Catherine A. & Mills, Anne, 2003. "The economic impact of malaria in Africa: a critical review of the evidence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 17-36, January.
  6. Audibert, Martine, 1986. "Agricultural non-wage production and health status : A case study in a tropical environment," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 275-291, December.
  7. Gollin, Douglas & Zimmermann, Christian, 2007. "Malaria: Disease Impacts and Long-Run Income Differences," IZA Discussion Papers 2997, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Wiebers, U.C., 1993. "Integrated Pest Management and Pesticide Regulation in Developing Asia," Papers 211, World Bank - Technical Papers.
  9. Davis, K. & Nkonya, E. & Kato, E. & Mekonnen, D.A. & Odendo, M. & Miiro, R. & Nkuba, J., 2012. "Impact of Farmer Field Schools on Agricultural Productivity and Poverty in East Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 402-413.
  10. Sharma, V.P. & Mehrotra, K.N., 1986. "Malaria resurgence in India: A critical study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 22(8), pages 835-845, January.
  11. de Bartolome, Charles A. M. & Vosti, Stephen A., 1995. "Choosing between public and private health-care: A case study of malaria treatment in Brazil," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 191-205, June.
  12. repec:sag:seajad:v:5:y:2008:i:1:p:42-56 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. John Akin & Paul Hutchinson & Koleman Strumpf, 2005. "Decentralisation and government provision of public goods: The public health sector in Uganda," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(8), pages 1417-1443.
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