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Foreign Aid Versus Military Intervention in the War on Terror

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Author Info

  • Jean-Paul Azam

    (Toulouse School of Economics (UT1, ARQADE), Toulouse, France, azam@univ-tlse1.fr, IDEI, Toulouse, France)

  • Véronique Thelen

    (Toulouse School of Economics (UT1, ARQADE), Toulouse, France)

Abstract

This article presents a theoretical framework and some empirical results showing that the level of foreign aid received reduces the supply of terrorist attacks from recipient countries, while U.S. military interventions are liable to increase this supply. Due account is taken of endogeneity problems in producing these results. They suggest that Western democracies, which are the main targets of terrorist attacks, should invest more funds in foreign aid, with a special emphasis on supporting education, and use military interventions more sparingly.

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File URL: http://jcr.sagepub.com/content/54/2/237.abstract
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Peace Science Society (International) in its journal Journal of Conflict Resolution.

Volume (Year): 54 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 237-261

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Handle: RePEc:sae:jocore:v:54:y:2010:i:2:p:237-261

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Web page: http://pss.la.psu.edu/

Related research

Keywords: terrorism; foreign aid; military intervention; education;

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Cited by:
  1. Vincenzo Bove & Petros G. Sekeris, 2011. "Economic Determinants of Third Party Intervention in Civil Conflict," Working Papers 1115, University of Namur, Department of Economics.
  2. Sarah Brockhoff & Tim Krieger & Daniel Meierrieks, 2012. "Great Expectations and Hard Times - The (Nontrivial) Impact of Education on Domestic Terrorism," CESifo Working Paper Series 3817, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Azam, Jean-Paul & Thelen, Véronique, 2013. "The Geo-Politics of Foreign Aid and Transnational Terrorism," IDEI Working Papers 792, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
  4. Todd Sandler, 2011. "The many faces of counterterrorism: an introduction," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 225-234, December.
  5. repec:pdn:wpaper:47 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Joseph Young & Michael Findley, 2011. "Can peace be purchased? A sectoral-level analysis of aid’s influence on transnational terrorism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 365-381, December.

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