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Sessanta anni di istruzione in Italia

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  • Daniele Checchi

    ()
    (Università degli Studi di Milano)

  • Carlo V. Fiorio

    ()
    (Università degli Studi di Milano)

  • Marco Leonardi

    ()
    (Università degli Studi di Milano)

Abstract

In this article we analyze the fulfilment of the 1948 Italian Republican Constitution regarding education. We verify that inequality in the highest degree of attained education has declined within cohorts and geographical areas. We also find a reduction of the impact of the parental background on educational choice over time. However, there still is a relevant difference in the probability of attaining a university degree depending on the parental education. Among the possible reasons, we investigate the differential return of a university degree between individuals with different familiar background, the difference in opportunity costs and the drop-out rates.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by SIPI Spa in its journal Rivista di Politica Economica.

Volume (Year): 96 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (July-August)
Pages: 285-318

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Handle: RePEc:rpo:ripoec:v:96:y:2006:i:4:p:285-318

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  1. Lorraine Dearden & Steve Machin & Howard Reed, 1995. "Intergenerational mobility in Britain," IFS Working Papers W95/20, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  2. Galor, Oded & Zeira, Joseph, 1988. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," MPRA Paper 51644, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Sep 1989.
  3. Belzil, Christian & Leonardi, Marco, 2007. "Can risk aversion explain schooling attainments? Evidence from Italy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(6), pages 957-970, December.
  4. Jere R. Behrman & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2002. "Does Increasing Women's Schooling Raise the Schooling of the Next Generation?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 323-334, March.
  5. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J. & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2003. "Why the Apple Doesn't Fall Far: Understanding Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital," IZA Discussion Papers 926, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Arnaud Chevalier, 2004. "Parental Education and Childs Education: A Natural Experiment," CEE Discussion Papers 0040, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  7. Anders Björklund & Mikael Lindahl & Erik Plug, 2006. "The Origins of Intergenerational Associations: Lessons from Swedish Adoption Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 121(3), pages 999-1028, 08.
  8. Erik Plug, 2004. "Estimating the Effect of Mother's Schooling on Children's Schooling Using a Sample of Adoptees," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 358-368, March.
  9. Miller, Paul & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 1997. "Family Characteristics and the Returns to Schooling: Evidence on Gender Differences from a Sample of Australian Twins," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(253), pages 119-36, February.
  10. Maoz, Yishay D & Moav, Omer, 1999. "Intergenerational Mobility and the Process of Development," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(458), pages 677-97, October.
  11. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Simona Monteleone, 2011. "Brain Drain and Economic Growth: A Critical Review," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 1, March.

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