Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Impact of light rail implementation on labor market accessibility: A transportation equity perspective

Contents:

Author Info

  • Fan, Yingling

    ()
    (University of Minnesota)

  • Guthrie, Andrew E

    ()
    (University of Minnesota)

  • Levinson, David M

    ()
    (University of Minnesota)

Abstract

This study seeks to examine transit’s role in promoting social equity by assessing before-after impacts of recent transit changes in the Twin Cities, including opening of the Hiawatha light rail line, on job accessibility among workers of different wage categories. Geo-spatial, descriptive and regression analyses find that proximity to light rail stations and bus stops offering direct rail connections are associated with large, statistically significant gains in accessibility to low-wage jobs. These gains stand out from changes in accessibility for the transit system as a whole. Implications of the study results for informing more equitable transit polices are discussed.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.jtlu.org/index.php/jtlu/article/download/240/272
File Function: Full text
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota in its journal The Journal of Transport and Land Use.

Volume (Year): 5 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 28-39

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ris:jtralu:0089

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.jtlu.org/index.php/jtlu
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: transit; social equity; Twin Cities;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Rappaport, Jordan & Kahn, Matthew E. & Glaeser, Edward, 2008. "Why Do The Poor Live In Cities? The Role of Public Transportation," Scholarly Articles 2958224, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  2. Blumenberg, Evelyn A. & Ong, Paul M. & Mondschein, Andrew, 2002. "Uneven Access to Opportunities: Welfare Recipients, Jobs, and Employment Support Services in Los Angeles," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3mq0b5j4, University of California Transportation Center.
  3. Sanchez, Thomas W., 2008. "Poverty, policy, and public transportation," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 833-841, June.
  4. Mizuki Kawabata, 2003. "Job access and employment among low-skilled autoless workers in US metropolitan areas," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(9), pages 1651-1668, September.
  5. Ong, Paul M. & Houston, Douglas, 2002. "Transit, Employment and Women on Welfare," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3287s046, University of California Transportation Center.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Jason Cao, 2013. "The association between light rail transit and satisfactions with travel and life: evidence from Twin Cities," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(5), pages 921-933, September.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ris:jtralu:0089. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Arlene Mathison).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.