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A Dynamic General Equilibrium Model of Driving, Gasoline Use and Vehicle Fuel Efficiency

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  • Chao Wei

    (George Washington University)

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Abstract

The paper constructs a dynamic general equilibrium model to study the endogenous determination of gasoline use, driving and vehicle fuel efficiency. Before vehicles are produced, their fuel efficiency can be chosen optimally. Once produced, their fuel efficiency cannot be changed. The model generates endogenously different short-run and long-run price elasticities of gasoline use, with their magnitudes well within the region of plausible estimates in the empirical literature. The paper shows that although raising gasoline taxes and tightening the CAFE standard both reduce gasoline use in the long run, they are different in terms of the transmission mechanism, magnitudes of responses and dynamic paths of key endogenous variables. (Copyright: Elsevier)

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.red.2012.11.004
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Article provided by Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics in its journal Review of Economic Dynamics.

Volume (Year): 16 (2013)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 650-667

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Handle: RePEc:red:issued:11-284

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Related research

Keywords: Gasoline use; Fuel efficiency; Vehicle miles of travel; CAFE; Gasoline taxes;

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  1. Chao Wei, 2003. "Energy, the Stock Market, and the Putty-Clay Investment Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 311-323, March.
  2. Bresnahan, Timothy F & Ramey, Valerie A, 1993. "Segment Shifts and Capacity Utilization in the U.S. Automobile Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 213-18, May.
  3. Gilbert Ghez & Gary S. Becker, 1975. "The Allocation of Time and Goods over the Life Cycle," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number ghez75-1, July.
  4. Simon Gilchrist & John C. Williams, 2002. "Investment, capacity, and uncertainty: a putty-clay approach," Working Paper Series 2002-03, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  5. Ian W. H. Parry & Kenneth A. Small, 2005. "Does Britain or the United States Have the Right Gasoline Tax?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1276-1289, September.
  6. Simon Gilchrist & John C. Williams, 1998. "Putty-Clay and Investment: A Business Cycle Analysis," NBER Working Papers 6812, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Bento, Antonio M. & Goulder, Lawrence H. & Jacobsen, Mark R. & von Haefen, Roger H., 2007. "Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Increased U.S. Gasoline Taxes," Working Papers 127021, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  8. Juster, F Thomas & Stafford, Frank P, 1991. "The Allocation of Time: Empirical Findings, Behavioral Models, and Problems of Measurement," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(2), pages 471-522, June.
  9. Clifton T Jones, 1993. "Another Look at U.S. Passenger Vehicle Use and the 'Rebound' Effect from Improved Fuel Efficiency," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 99-110.
  10. David L. Greene & James R. Kahn & Robert C. Gibson, 1999. "Fuel Economy Rebound Effect for U.S. Household Vehicles," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 1-31.
  11. Gilbert Ghez & Gary S. Becker, 1975. "A Theory of the Allocation of Time and Goods Over the Life Cycle," NBER Chapters, in: The Allocation of Time and Goods over the Life Cycle, pages 1-45 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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