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The Supply Side of the Digital Divide: Is There Equal Availability in the Broadband Internet Access Market?

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  • James E. Prieger

Abstract

The newest dimension of the digital divide is access to broadband (high-speed) Internet service. Using comprehensive U.S. data covering all forms of access technology (chiefly DSL and cable modem), I look for evidence of unequal broadband availability in areas with high concentrations of poor, minority, or rural households. There is little evidence of unequal availability based on income or on black or Hispanic concentration. There is mixed evidence concerning availability based on Native American or Asian concentration. Other findings: Rural location decreases availability; market size, education, Spanish language use, commuting distance, and Bell presence increase availability. Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 41 (2003)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 346-363

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:41:y:2003:i:2:p:346-363

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References

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  1. Jerry A. Hausman & J. Gregory Sidak & HalJ. Singer, 2001. "Cable Modems and DSL: Broadband Internet Access for Residential Customers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 302-307, May.
  2. Geoffrey M. Tootell, 1996. "Redlining in Boston: do mortgage lenders discriminate against neighborhoods?," Working Papers 96-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  3. Prieger, James E., 2001. "The Supply Side of the Digital Divide: Is There Redlining in the Broadband Internet Access Market'," Working paper 518, Regulation2point0.
  4. Madden, Gary G & Savage, Scott J & Coble-Neal, Grant & Bloxham, Paul, 2000. "Advanced communications policy and adoption in rural Western Australia," MPRA Paper 11163, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Peter C. Reiss, 1987. "Do Entry Conditions Vary across Markets?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 18(3), pages 833-882.
  6. Berry, Steven T, 1992. "Estimation of a Model of Entry in the Airline Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(4), pages 889-917, July.
  7. Faulhaber, Gerald R & Hogendorn, Christiaan, 2000. "The Market Structure of Broadband Telecommunications," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 305-29, September.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Victor Glass & Stela Stefanova, 2010. "An empirical study of broadband diffusion in rural America," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 70-85, August.
  2. Grubesic, Tony H., 2006. "A spatial taxonomy of broadband regions in the United States," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 423-448, November.
  3. Kolko, Jed, 2006. "Why Should Governments Support Broadband Adoption?," MPRA Paper 3363, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Filippo Belloc & Antonio Nicita & Maria Alessandra Rossi, 2011. "The Nature, Timing and Impact of Broadband Policies: a Panel Analysis of 30 OECD Countries," Department of Economics University of Siena 615, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  5. Xiao, Mo & Orazem, Peter, 2010. "Does the Fourth Entrant Make Any Difference? Entry and Competition in the Early U.S. Broadband Market," Staff General Research Papers 32147, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  6. Prieger, James E. & Hu, Wei-Min, 2008. "The broadband digital divide and the nexus of race, competition, and quality," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 150-167, June.
  7. Hitt, Lorin & Tambe, Prasanna, 2007. "Broadband adoption and content consumption," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 19(3-4), pages 362-378, October.
  8. Brian Whitacre, 2010. "The market and infrastructure perspective: reply," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 239-243, August.
  9. Renkow, Mitch, 2011. "Residential Broadband Availability: Evidence from Kentucky and North Carolina," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 40(2), August.
  10. Briggeman, Brian C. & Whitacre, Brian E., 2010. "Farming and the Internet: Reasons for Non-Use," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 39(3), October.
  11. Nina Czernich, 2011. "The emergence of broadband internet and consequences for economic and social development," ifo Beitr├Ąge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 37.
  12. Amitay Alter, 2006. "The Effect of Access Regulation on Broadbnd Deployment," Discussion Papers 06-017, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  13. Machiel van Dijk & Bert Minne & Machiel Mulder & Henry van der Wiel & J. Poort, 2005. "Do market failures hamper the perspectives of broadband?," CPB Document 102, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  14. Jason Chan & Anindya Ghose & Robert Seamans, 2013. "The Internet and Hate Crime: Offline Spillovers from Online Access," Working Papers 13-02, NET Institute.
  15. Kolko, Jed, 2012. "Broadband and local growth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 100-113.
  16. Savage, Scott James & Waldman, Donald M., 2009. "Ability, location and household demand for Internet bandwidth," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 166-174, March.
  17. Xiao, Mo & Orazem, Peter, 2006. "Do Entry Conditions Vary over Time? Entry and Competition in the Broadband Market: 1999-2003," Staff General Research Papers 12500, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  18. Mack, Elizabeth A. & Grubesic, Tony H., 2009. "Forecasting broadband provision," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 297-311, November.

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