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Political Instrumentalization of Religion: The Case of Islam

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  • Jean-Philippe Platteau

    (University of Namur)

Abstract

The question as to whether religion can block economic development and institutional change assumes particular importance today because of the rise of Islamist movements and the disappointing economic performances in the lands of Islam. This paper starts from a critical examination of the thesis of Bernard Lewis according to which the lack of separation between religion and politics creates particular difficulties on the way to modern economic growth in these lands. It is argued that (1) Lewis’ thesis conceals the critical fact that, even when political and religious functions appear to be merged, religion is the handmaiden rather than the master of politics; (2) the influence of religion increases when the state falls into crisis, owing to its impotence or excessive absolutism; (3) because the Islamic frame of reference provides political rulers with a cheap default option when they are contested, they rarely undertake the much-needed reforms of the country’s institutions; (4) this way of escape is all the more attractive to contested rulers as Islamist movements, born of the internal situation as well as of the international environment, accuse them of un-Islamic behaviour. An obscurantist deadlock is thereby created, which is aggravated by the inability of major Western countries to take an enlightened route in dealing with major issues confronting Middle Eastern countries.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Nordic Journal of Political Economy in its journal Nordic Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 35 (2009)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 3

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Handle: RePEc:noj:journl:v:35:y:2009:p:3

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Keywords: religion; political manipulation; ideology; Islam; fundamentalism;

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  1. Badawi, Ibrahim El & Makdisi, Samir, 2007. "Explaining the democracy deficit in the Arab world," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(5), pages 813-831, February.
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