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The impact of childbirth on Spanish women’s decisions to leave the labor market

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Author Info

  • Ainhoa Herrarte

    ()

  • Julián Moral-Carcedo

    ()

  • Felipe Sáez

    ()

Abstract

The present paper analyzes the effect of childbirth on Spanish women’s decisions to withdraw from paid work, defined here as the transition from employment to out of the labor force due to the requirements of household production. Decisions regarding fertility and labor market participation are interrelated and depend on individual and household characteristics, as well as external variables such as the availability of childcare services. We postulate that a female’s decision to leave the labor market is taken in a household context, and thus is the outcome which maximizes household welfare after taking into account the employment and earnings characteristics of all household members. We pay special attention to the effect of the male partner’s characteristics upon the female’s decision to withdraw from the labor market. Our empirical results show that in order to better define social and labor market policies on work and family reconciliation, increased attention should be paid to the job characteristics of males given their effect on the optimal assignment of tasks within the household following childbirth. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Review of Economics of the Household.

Volume (Year): 10 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 441-468

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Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:10:y:2012:i:3:p:441-468

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=109451

Related research

Keywords: Labor market withdrawal; Employment transitions; Maternity decisions; Work and family reconciliation; Labor market policy; Childcare services; J22; J08; D13;

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References

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  1. Dolado, Juan J. & Garcia-Serrano, Carlos & Jimeno, Juan Francisco, 2001. "Drawing Lessons From the Boom of Temporary Jobs in Spain," CEPR Discussion Papers 2884, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. María Suárez, 2013. "Working mothers’ decisions on childcare: the case of Spain," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 545-561, December.
  2. Fazeer Rahim, 2014. "Work-family attitudes and career interruptions due to childbirth," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 177-205, March.
  3. Lorenzo Escot & José Fernández-Cornejo & Carlos Poza, 2014. "Fathers’ Use of Childbirth Leave in Spain. The Effects of the 13-Day Paternity Leave," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 419-453, June.
  4. María Davia & Nuria Legazpe, 2014. "Determinants of Employment Decisions After the First Child Birth in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 214-227, June.
  5. Mayssun El-Attar, 2013. "Trust, child care technology choice and female labor force participation," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 507-544, December.

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