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Afraid to be free: Dependency as desideratum

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  • James Buchanan

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Abstract

Although collectivist ideas have everywhere fallen into disrepute, this essay argues that socialism nevertheless will survive and be extended in the new century. That gloomy prospect looms, not because socialism is more efficient or more just, but because ceding control over their actions to others allows individuals to escape, evade and even deny personal responsibilities. People are afraid to be free; the state stands in loco parentis. The breaching of plausibly acceptable fiscal limits in the first half of the new century will determine how the basic conflict between welfare dependency and liberal principles will be resolved. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11127-005-4743-2
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Public Choice.

Volume (Year): 124 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (July)
Pages: 19-31

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Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:124:y:2005:i:1:p:19-31

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100332

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Cited by:
  1. Berggren, Niclas & Bjørnskov, Christian, 2009. "Is the Importance of Religion in Daily Life Related to Social Trust? Cross-Country and Cross-State Comparisons," Ratio Working Papers 142, The Ratio Institute.
  2. Peter Boettke & Nicholas Snow, 2014. "Political economy and the science of association: A suggested reconstruction of public choice through the alliance of the Vienna, Virginia, and Bloomington schools of political economy," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 97-110, March.
  3. Paul Raschky, 2007. "The overprotective parent - Bureaucratic agencies and natural hazard management," Working Papers 2007-03, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
  4. Alfred Wong & Sofia Fang & Dean Tjosvold, 2012. "Developing business trust in government through resource exchange in China," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 1027-1043, December.
  5. Dean Tjosvold & Ann Peng & Yi Chen & Fang Su, 2008. "Business and government interdependence in China: Cooperative goals to develop industries and the marketplace," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 225-249, June.
  6. William Shughart, 2006. "Katrinanomics: The politics and economics of disaster relief," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 127(1), pages 31-53, April.
  7. Ulrich Witt & Christian Schubert, 2008. "Constitutional interests in the face of innovations: how much do we need to know about risk preferences?," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 19(3), pages 203-225, September.

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