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Evidence of Differences in the Effectiveness of Safety-Net Management in European Union Countries

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Author Info

  • Santiago Carbo-Valverde

    ()

  • Edward Kane

    ()

  • Francisco Rodriguez-Fernandez

    ()

Abstract

EU financial safety nets are social contracts that assign uncertain benefits and burdens to taxpayers in different member countries. To help national officials to assess their taxpayers' exposures to loss from partner countries, this paper develops a way to estimate how well markets and regulators in 14 of the EU-15 countries have controlled deposit-institution risk-shifting in recent years. Our method traverses two steps. The first step estimates leverage, return volatility, and safety-net benefits for individual EU financial institutions. For stockholder-owned banks, input data feature 1993-2004 data on stock-market capitalization. Parallel accounting values are used to calculate enterprise value (albeit less precisely) for mutual savings institutions. The second step uses the output from the first step as input into regression models of safety-net benefits and interprets the results. Parameters of the second-step models express differences in the magnitude of safety-net subsidies and in the ability of financial markets and regulators in member countries to restrain the flow of safety-net subsidies to commercial banks and savings institutions. We conclude by showing that banks from high-subsidy and low-restraint countries have initiated and received the lion's share of cross-border M&A activity. The efficiency, stabilization, and distributional effects of allowing banks to and from differently subsidized environments to expand their operations in partner countries pose policy issues that the EU ought to address.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10693-008-0032-9
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Financial Services Research.

Volume (Year): 34 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (December)
Pages: 151-176

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jfsres:v:34:y:2008:i:2:p:151-176

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=102934

Related research

Keywords: Safety-net; Banks; Risk-shifting; Insurance premium; M&A;

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References

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  1. Armen Hovakimian & Edward J. Kane & Luc Laeven, 2002. "How Country and Safety-Net Characteristics Affect Bank Risk-Shifting," NBER Working Papers 9322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Robert A. Eisenbeis & George G. Kaufman, 2007. "Cross-border banking: challenges for deposit insurance and financial stability in the European Union," Working Paper 2006-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  3. Honohan, Patrick & Klingebiel, Daniela, 2003. "The fiscal cost implications of an accommodating approach to banking crises," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 1539-1560, August.
  4. Huizinga, Harry, 2005. "The EU Deposit Insurance Directive: Does One Size Fit All?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5277, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Robert A. Eisenbeis, 2006. "Home country versus cross-border negative externalities in large banking organization failures and how to avoid them," Working Paper 2006-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  6. Robert A. Eisenbeis, 2004. "Agency problems and goal conflicts," Working Paper 2004-24, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Santiago Carbó-Valverde, 2007. "Implications of Basel II for Different Bank Ownership Patterns in Europe," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 35(4), pages 391-397, December.
  2. Hagendorff, Jens & Hernando, Ignacio & Nieto, Maria J. & Wall, Larry D., 2012. "What do premiums paid for bank M&As reflect? The case of the European Union," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 749-759.
  3. Santiago Carbo-Valverde & Edward J. Kane & Francisco Rodriguez-Fernandez, 2009. "Evidence of Regulatory Arbitrage in Cross-Border Mergers of Banks in the EU," NBER Working Papers 15447, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Douglas Evanoff & Haluk Unal, 2008. "Introduction to the Special Issue: The Bank Structure Conference through the years," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 93-97, December.
  5. Santiago Carbo-Valverde & Edward J. Kane & Francisco Rodriguez-Fernandez, 2011. "Safety-Net Benefits Conferred on Difficult-to-Fail-and-Unwind Banks in the US and EU Before and During the Great Recession," NBER Working Papers 16787, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Phil Molyneux & Klaus Schaeck & Tim Zhou, 2011. "‘Too Systemically Important to Fail’ in Banking," Working Papers 11011, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
  7. Francesco Vallascas & Kevin Keasey, 2013. "The Volatility of European Banking Systems: A Two-Decade Study," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 37-68, February.
  8. Jens Hagendorff & María J. Nieto & Larry D. Wall, 2012. "The safety and soundness effects of bank M&As in the EU: does prudential regulation have any impact?," Banco de Espa�a Working Papers 1236, Banco de Espa�a.
  9. Mark M. Spiegel, 2009. "Monetary and Financial Integration in the EMU: Push or Pull?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(4), pages 751-776, 09.
  10. Jens Hagendorff & Maria J. Nieto & Larry D. Wall, 2012. "The safety and soundness effects of bank M&A in the EU," Working Paper 2012-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  11. Weiß, Gregor N.F. & Neumann, Sascha & Bostandzic, Denefa, 2014. "Systemic risk and bank consolidation: International evidence," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 165-181.

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