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How Employed Mothers in Australia Find Time for Both Market Work and Childcare

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  • Lyn Craig

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    Abstract

    Time use studies find that employed mothers reduce their parental childcare time by much less than an hour for every hour they spend in market work. This paper uses data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics Time Use Survey 1997 (4,059 randomly selected households) to investigate how employed mothers manage to avoid a one-for-one trade-off between work and childcare. It compares the time allocation of employed fathers, employed mothers and non-employed mothers and finds that parents use non-parental childcare to reschedule as well as to replace their own childcare, that employed mothers reschedule activities from weekdays to weekends or to earlier or later in the day, and spend less time than other mothers in housework, childfree leisure and personal care. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-006-9047-2
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Family and Economic Issues.

    Volume (Year): 28 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 69-87

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:28:y:2007:i:1:p:69-87

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=104904

    Related research

    Keywords: Childcare; Gender; Non-parental care; Time use; Work-family balance;

    References

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    1. Michael Bittman, 1999. "Parenthood Without Penalty: Time Use And Public Policy In Australia And Finland," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 27-42.
    2. Valerie Lechene & Martin Browning, 2002. "Children and Demand: Direct and Non-Direct Effects," Economics Series Working Papers 16, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    3. Dominique Anxo & Paul Carlin, 2004. "Intra-family time allocation to housework - French evidence," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 1(1), pages 14-36, August.
    4. David M. Blau, 1997. "The Production of Quality in Child Care Centers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(2), pages 354-387.
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    Cited by:
    1. Scott Fuess & Jack Hou, 2009. "Rapid Economic Development and Job Segregation in Taiwan," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 171-183, June.
    2. Ross Guest & Nick Parr, 2013. "Family policy and couples’ labour supply: an empirical assessment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 1631-1660, October.
    3. José Alberto Molina & Víctor M. Montuenga, 2008. "The Motherhood Wage Penalty in a Mediterranean Country: The Case of Spain," Documentos de Trabajo dt2008-02, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    4. Karina Shreffler & Amy Pirretti & Robert Drago, 2010. "Work–Family Conflict and Fertility Intentions: Does Gender Matter?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 228-240, June.
    5. M. Nakhaie, 2009. "Professors, Ideology and Housework," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 399-411, December.
    6. George Hondroyiannis, 2010. "Fertility Determinants and Economic Uncertainty: An Assessment Using European Panel Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 33-50, March.
    7. Charlene Kalenkoski & Gigi Foster, 2008. "The quality of time spent with children in Australian households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 243-266, September.
    8. Maria Gutiérrez-Domènech, 2010. "Parental employment and time with children in Spain," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 371-391, September.
    9. Pia S. Schober, 2012. "Parental Leave Policies and Child Care Time in Couples after Childbirth," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 434, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Nick Parr & Ross Guest, 2011. "The contribution of increases in family benefits to Australia’s early 21st-century fertility increase: An empirical analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(6), pages 215-244, July.
    11. Berenice Monna & Anne Gauthier, 2008. "A Review of the Literature on the Social and Economic Determinants of Parental Time," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 634-653, December.
    12. José Molina & Víctor Montuenga, 2009. "The Motherhood Wage Penalty in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 237-251, September.
    13. Jennifer Baxter, 2011. "Flexible Work Hours and Other Job Factors in Parental Time with Children," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 101(2), pages 239-242, April.
    14. Andrew Tan & Steven Yen & Rodolfo Nayga, 2009. "Factors Affecting Alcohol Purchase Decisions and Expenditures: A Sample Selection Analysis by Ethnicity in Malaysia," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 149-159, June.
    15. Ana Moro-Egido, 2012. "Changing Trends of Mothers’ Active and Passive Childcare Times," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 11-23, March.
    16. Cristina Borra & Luis Palma, 2009. "Child Care Choices in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 323-338, December.
    17. Anne Winkler & Thomas Ireland, 2009. "Time Spent in Household Management: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 293-304, September.
    18. Jean Wallace, 2008. "Parenthood and Commitment to the Legal Profession: Are Mothers Less Committed than Fathers?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 478-495, September.
    19. Wen You & George Davis, 2011. "Childhood Overweight: Does Quality of Parental Childcare Time Matter?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 219-232, June.
    20. José Giménez-Nadal & Miriam Marcén & Raquel Ortega, 2012. "Substitution and Presence Effects of Children on Mothers’ Adult Care Time," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 2-10, March.

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