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Historical changes in the household division of labor

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  • Jonathan Gershuny
  • John Robinson
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/2061320
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

    Volume (Year): 25 (1988)
    Issue (Month): 4 (November)
    Pages: 537-552

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:25:y:1988:i:4:p:537-552

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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    References

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    1. Kooreman, P. & Kapteyn, A.J., 1984. "A disaggregated analysis of the allocation of time within the household," Research Memorandum 153, Tilburg University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
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    Cited by:
    1. Bruno Falcão & Rodrigo Soares, 2006. "The Demographic Transition and the Sexual Division of Labor," 2006 Meeting Papers 49, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Self, Sharmistha, 2005. "What makes motherhood so expensive?: The role of social expectations, interdependence, and coordination failure in explaining lower wages of mothers," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 850-865, December.
    3. Susan Himmelweit, 2002. "Making Visible the Hidden Economy: The Case for Gender-Impact Analysis of Economic Policy," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 49-70.
    4. Dora L. Costa, 2000. "From Mill Town to Board Room: The Rise of Women's Paid Labor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 101-122, Fall.
    5. Starr, Martha A., 2009. "The social economics of ethical consumption: Theoretical considerations and empirical evidence," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 916-925, December.
    6. Harriet Presser, 1989. "Can we make time for children? the economy, work schedules, and child care," Demography, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 523-543, November.
    7. Anne H. Gauthier & Timothy M. Smeeding & Frank F. Furstenberg, Jr., 2004. "Do We Invest Less Time in Children? Trends in Parental Time in Selected Industrialized Countries Since the 1960's," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 64, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    8. Spitze, Glenna & Loscocco, Karyn, 1999. "Women's position in the household," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 647-661.
    9. Jutta M. Joesch & C. Katharina Spiess, 2002. "European Mothers' Time with Children: Differences and Similarities across Nine Countries," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 305, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    10. Kalenkoski, Charlene M. & Ribar, David C. & Stratton, Leslie S., 2006. "The Effect of Family Structure on Parents' Child Care Time in the United States and the United Kingdom," IZA Discussion Papers 2441, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Antonopoulos, Rania, 2009. "The unpaid care work : paid work connection," ILO Working Papers 427404, International Labour Organization.
    12. Almudena Sevilla, 2014. "On the importance of time diary data and introduction to a special issue on time use research," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-6, March.
    13. Jeremy Greenwood & Ananth Seshadri, 2004. "Engines of Liberation - Additional Notes," RCER Working Papers 506, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).

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