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An Environmentally Extended Social Accounting Matrix

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  • Jian Xie
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    Abstract

    Although the social accounting matrix(SAM) approach has been widely used in nationalaccounting and development economics, it still neglectsimportant information, among which are theinteractions between an economy and the environment. This paper environmentally extends SAM to capture therelationships among economic activities, pollutionabatement activities, and pollution emissions. Anumerical example of the environmentally extendedsocial accounting matrix (ESAM) using Chinese 1990data is presented. The multiplier and structural pathanalyses are applied to the ESAM for assessingenvironmental impacts of pollution-related economicpolicies. The analysis results show that an ESAM canbe a useful tool for environmental policy analysis. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1008376618447
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists in its journal Environmental and Resource Economics.

    Volume (Year): 16 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 4 (August)
    Pages: 391-406

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:16:y:2000:i:4:p:391-406

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100263

    Related research

    Keywords: social accounting matrix; environmental social accounting matrix; environmental policy analysis; multiplier analysis; structural path analysis;

    References

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    1. Pyatt, Graham, 1988. "A SAM approach to modeling," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 327-352.
    2. de Haan, Mark & Keuning, Steven J, 1996. "Taking the Environment into Account: The NAMEA Approach," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 42(2), pages 131-48, June.
    3. Lewis, Blane D. & Thorbecke, Erik, 1992. "District-level economic linkages in Kenya: Evidence based on a small regional social accounting matrix," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 881-897, June.
    4. Pyatt, F Graham & Round, Jeffery I, 1979. "Accounting and Fixed Price Multipliers in a Social Accounting Matrix Framework," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 89(356), pages 850-73, December.
    5. Robinson, Sherman, 1989. "Multisectoral models," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 18, pages 885-947 Elsevier.
    6. Leontief, Wassily, 1970. "Environmental Repercussions and the Economic Structure: An Input-Output Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 52(3), pages 262-71, August.
    7. Defourny, Jacques & Thorbecke, Erik, 1984. "Structural Path Analysis and Multiplier Decomposition within a Social Accounting Matrix Framework," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(373), pages 111-36, March.
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    Cited by:
    1. Parra, Juan Carlos & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "How Does Growth Affect Labor Income by Gender? A Structural Path Analysis for Tanzania," MPRA Paper 27735, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Manfred Lenzen & Roberto Schaeffer, 2004. "Environmental and Social Accounting for Brazil," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 27(2), pages 201-226, February.
    3. Ge, Jianping & Lei, Yalin, 2013. "Mining development, income growth and poverty alleviation: A multiplier decomposition technique applied to China," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 278-287.
    4. Llop Llop, Maria & Pié Dols, Laia, 2009. "The Analysis of Accounting Multipliers: The NAMEA Approach in the Case of Catalonia," Working Papers 2072/43861, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    5. Yeh, Tsai-lien & Chen, Tser-yieth & Lai, Pei-ying, 2010. "A comparative study of energy utilization efficiency between Taiwan and China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 2386-2394, May.
    6. Duarte, Rosa & Mainar, Alfredo & Sánchez-Chóliz, Julio, 2010. "The impact of household consumption patterns on emissions in Spain," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 176-185, January.
    7. Jin, Di & Hoagland, Porter & Morin Dalton, Tracey, 2003. "Linking economic and ecological models for a marine ecosystem," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 367-385, October.

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