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Making Reform Work: Institutions, Dispositions, and the Improving Health of Bangladesh

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  • Faguet, Jean-Paul
  • Ali, Zulfiqar

Abstract

Summary We examine whether local governance can improve social development empirically, using good and bad cases of public health outcomes in Bangladesh. We explore the institutional underpinnings of service provision, digging down beneath the "rules of the game" to analyze the beliefs, understandings, and dispositions that drive social behavior. Changes in deep social attitudes led to improvements in social indicators. Regional variation in health outcomes is explained by the presence or absence of a dense web of relationships that enmeshed reformers in local systems of authority and legitimacy, strengthening their actions and making local society more susceptible to change.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 37 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 208-218

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:1:p:208-218

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

Related research

Keywords: local governance accountability decentralization social development Bangladesh Asia;

References

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  1. Ellis, Frank & Bahiigwa, Godfrey, 2003. "Livelihoods and Rural Poverty Reduction in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 997-1013, June.
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  15. Parry, Taryn Rounds, 1997. "Achieving balance in decentralization: A case study of education decentralization in Chile," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 211-225, February.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Abdul-Gafaru Abdulai, 2014. "Rethinking spatial inequalities in development: the primacy of politics and power relations," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series esid-029-14, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  2. Andrew McNee, 2012. "Illuminating the local: can non-formal institutions be complementary to health system development in Papua New Guinea?," Development Policy Centre Discussion Papers 1215, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  3. Magrath, Priscilla & Nichter, Mark, 2012. "Paying for performance and the social relations of health care provision: An anthropological perspective," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1778-1785.

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