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Job loss is bad for your health - Swedish evidence on cause-specific hospitalization following involuntary job loss

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  • Eliason, Marcus
  • Storrie, Donald

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of job loss on a number of non-fatal health events, which are nonetheless severe enough to require hospital in-patient care. We focus on job loss due only to establishment closures, as this reduces the problem of distinguishing between causation and selection. Using linked employee-employer register data, we identify the job losses due to all establishment closures in Sweden in 1987 or 1988. During a subsequent 12-year period, we find that job loss significantly increases the risk of hospitalization due to alcohol-related conditions, among both men and women, and due to traffic accidents and self-harm, among men only. We find no evidence, however, that job loss increased the risk of severe cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction or stroke.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

Volume (Year): 68 (2009)
Issue (Month): 8 (April)
Pages: 1396-1406

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Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:68:y:2009:i:8:p:1396-1406

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Related research

Keywords: Sweden Plant closure Displaced workers Hospital admission Unemployment Ill-health;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. David Seim, 2012. "Job displacement and labor market outcomes by skill level," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2012-4, Bank of Estonia.
  2. Frauke H. Peter, 2013. "Trick or Treat?: Maternal Involuntary Job Loss and Children's Non-cognitive Skills," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1297, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  3. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J. & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2012. "Losing Heart? The Effect of Job Displacement on Health," IZA Discussion Papers 7117, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Hallberg, Daniel & Johansson, Per & Josephson, Malin, 2014. "Early retirement and post retirement health," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2014:5, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  5. Bassanini, Andrea & Caroli, Eve, 2014. "Is Work Bad for Health? The Role of Constraint vs Choice," IZA Discussion Papers 7891, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Venke Furre Haaland & Kjetil Telle, 2013. "Pro-cyclical mortality. Evidence from Norway," Discussion Papers 766, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
  7. Mariya Melnychuk, 2012. "Mental health and economic conditions: how do economic fluctuations influence mental problems?," Working Papers. Serie AD 2012-08, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  8. Mari Rege & Torbjørn Skardhamar & Kjetil Telle & Mark Votruba, 2009. "The effect of plant closure on crime," Discussion Papers 593, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
  9. Leombruni, Roberto & Razzolini, Tiziano & Serti, Francesco, 2013. "The pecuniary and non-pecuniary costs of job displacement—The risky job of being back to work," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 205-216.
  10. Browning, Martin & Heinesen, Eskil, 2012. "Effect of job loss due to plant closure on mortality and hospitalization," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 599-616.
  11. Janet Currie & Erdal Tekin, 2011. "Is there a Link Between Foreclosure and Health?," NBER Working Papers 17310, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Carrington, William J. & Fallick, Bruce C., 2014. "Why Do Earnings Fall with Job Displacement?," Working Paper 1405, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  13. Rosenthal, Lisa & Carroll-Scott, Amy & Earnshaw, Valerie A. & Santilli, Alycia & Ickovics, Jeannette R., 2012. "The importance of full-time work for urban adults' mental and physical health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(9), pages 1692-1696.
  14. Bratsberg, Bernt & Fevang, Elisabeth & Røed, Knut, 2013. "Job loss and disability insurance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 137-150.
  15. Bratsberg, Bernt & Fevang, Elisabeth & Røed, Knut, 2010. "Disability in the Welfare State: An Unemployment Problem in Disguise?," IZA Discussion Papers 4897, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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