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Why do small firms produce the entrepreneurs?

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  • Parker, Simon C

Abstract

Employees are significantly more likely to quit small rather than large firms to found new ventures. I examine empirically three alternative theories that might explain this finding: a transmission theory; a blocked mobility theory; and self-selection of workers. A representative sample of British panel data containing information on workplace, job and personal characteristics from 1991 to 2003 are used to explore the relationship between firm size and transitions into self-employment. The transmission and blocked mobility theories do not receive consistent empirical backing whereas the selection theory does. The implications of these findings for researchers and policy-makers are discussed.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

Volume (Year): 38 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 484-494

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Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:38:y:2009:i:3:p:484-494

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

Related research

Keywords: Entrepreneurship Self-employment Occupational choice Firm size;

References

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  1. Craig R. Littler & Retha Wiesner & Richard Dunford, 2003. "The Dynamics of Delayering: Changing Management Structures in Three Countries," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 225-256, 03.
  2. Parker,Simon C., 2006. "The Economics of Self-Employment and Entrepreneurship," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521030632, October.
  3. Erol Taymaz, 2005. "Are Small Firms Really Less Productive?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 25(5), pages 429-445, December.
  4. Matthias Benz & Bruno S. Frey, 2008. "Being Independent is a Great Thing: Subjective Evaluations of Self-Employment and Hierarchy," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(298), pages 362-383, 05.
  5. James O. Fiet, 2007. "A Prescriptive Analysis of Search and Discovery," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(4), pages 592-611, 06.
  6. Leontaridi, Marianthi Rannia, 1998. " Segmented Labour Markets: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(1), pages 63-101, February.
  7. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:10:y:2007:i:10:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Hyytinen, Ari & Maliranta, Mika, 2006. "When Do Employees Leave Their Job for Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Linked Employer-Employee Data," Discussion Papers 1023, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  9. Kihlstrom, Richard E & Laffont, Jean-Jacques, 1979. "A General Equilibrium Entrepreneurial Theory of Firm Formation Based on Risk Aversion," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(4), pages 719-48, August.
  10. Erik Hurst & Annamaria Lusardi, 2004. "Liquidity Constraints, Household Wealth, and Entrepreneurship," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(2), pages 319-347, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Michael Fritsch & Ronney Aamoucke, 2013. "Regional public research, higher education, and innovative start-ups: an empirical investigation," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 865-885, December.
  2. Oberschachtsiek, Dirk, 2010. "How do local labor market conditions and individual characteristics affect quitting selfemployment?," Discussion Papers, Presidential Department P 2010-001, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
  3. Niels Bosma & Sander Wennekers & F. Stam, 2010. "Intrapreneurship - An international study," Scales Research Reports H201005, EIM Business and Policy Research.
  4. Altin Vejsiu, 2011. "Incentives to self-employment decision in Sweden," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 379-403.
  5. Wennberg, Karl & Wiklund, Johan & Wright, Mike, 2011. "The effectiveness of university knowledge spillovers: Performance differences between university spinoffs and corporate spinoffs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1128-1143, October.
  6. Niels Bosma & Sander Wennekers & F. Stam, 2013. "Institutions and the allocation of entrepreneurship across new and established organizations," Scales Research Reports H201213, EIM Business and Policy Research.
  7. Michael Stuetzer & Martin Obschonka & Eva Schmitt-Rodermund, 2013. "Balanced skills among nascent entrepreneurs," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 93-114, June.
  8. Backes-Gellner, Uschi & Moog, Petra, 2013. "The disposition to become an entrepreneur and the jacks-of-all-trades in social and human capital," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 55-72.
  9. Werner, Arndt & Moog, Petra, 2009. "Why do Employees Leave Their Jobs for Self-Employment? – The Impact of Entrepreneurial Working Conditions in Small Firms," MPRA Paper 18826, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Alina Sorgner & Michael Fritsch, 2013. "Occupational Choice and Self-Employment - Are They Related?," Jena Economic Research Papers 2013-001, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.
  11. Elisabeth Bublitz & Florian Noseleit, 2011. "The Skill Balancing Act: Determinants of and Returns to Balanced Skills," Jena Economic Research Papers 2011-025, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.
  12. Michael Fritsch & Elisabeth Bublitz & Alina Rusakova & Michael Wyrwich, 2012. "How Much of a Socialist Legacy? The Reemergence of Entrepreneurship in the East German Transformation to a Market Economy," Jena Economic Research Papers 2012-042, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics.
  13. N.S. Bosma & E. Stam & S. Wennekers, 2012. "Entrepreneurial Employee Activity: A Large Scale International Study," Working Papers 12-12, Utrecht School of Economics.
  14. Elisabeth Bublitz & Florian Noseleit, 2014. "The skill balancing act: when does broad expertise pay off?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 17-32, January.

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