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Segmented Labour Markets: Theory and Evidence

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  • Leontaridi, Marianthi Rannia
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    Abstract

    This paper examines the possibility of accepting the labour market segmentation approach as a valid alternative to the classical and neo-classical analysis of labour markets. It consists of three main parts. The first part contains a historical analysis of both the distant and recent origins of the labour market segmentation hypothesis. Part two outlines the central ideas of both segmentationalists and radical theorists who attempted to explain the fragmented nature of labour markets and the importance of institutional and social influences upon pay, employment and mobility of individual workers between different labour market sectors. The third part examines the case for labour market segmentation using four alternative techniques and discusses the issue of mobility among different labour market segments. It is thereby concluded that the lack of agreement among the segmented labour market theorists on both theoretical and methodological issues has prevented them from developing a consistent and convincing argument based on verifiable empirical evidence to validate their thesis. Copyright 1998 by Blackwell Publishers Ltd

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Journal of Economic Surveys.

    Volume (Year): 12 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 1 (February)
    Pages: 63-101

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:12:y:1998:i:1:p:63-101

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    Cited by:
    1. Antoni, Manfred & Heineck, Guido, 2012. "Do literacy and numeracy pay off? On the relationship between basic skills and earnings," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 65404, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Roberto Pedace, 2000. "Immigration, Labor Market Mobility, and the Earnings of Native-born Workers: An Occupational Segmentation Approach," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2000-46, Claremont Colleges.
    3. Christian Pfeifer, 2012. "Fixed-term contracts and wages revisited using linked employer-employee data," Journal of Labour Market Research, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 171-183, July.
    4. Parker, Simon C, 2009. "Why do small firms produce the entrepreneurs?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 484-494, June.
    5. LEDUC Kristell & GENEVOIS Anne-Sophie, 2012. "Segmentation du marché du travail - le cas luxembourgeois," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2012-35, CEPS/INSTEAD.
    6. Paolo Falco, 2013. "Does risk matter for occupational choices? Experimental evidence from an African labour market," CSAE Working Paper Series 2013-15, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    7. Fernando Botelho & Vladimir Ponczek, 2011. "Segmentation in the Brazilian Labor Market," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(2), pages 437 - 463.
    8. Olivier Bargain & Prudence Kwenda, 2009. "The Informal Sector Wage Gap: New Evidence Using Quantile Regressions on Panel Data," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 09-06, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
    9. Román, Concepción & Congregado, Emilio & Millán, José María, 2013. "Start-up incentives: Entrepreneurship policy or active labour market programme?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 151-175.
    10. Leontaridi, Rannia M., 2002. "Career, experience and returns to human capital: is the dual labour market hypothesis relevant for the UK?," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 399-426, December.
    11. Bradley, Steve & Crouchley, Rob & Oskrochi, Reza, 2003. "Social exclusion and labour market transitions: a multi-state multi-spell analysis using the BHPS," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(6), pages 659-679, December.
    12. Christian Manuel Posso, 2010. "Calidad del empleo y segmentación laboral: un análisis para el mercado laboral colombiano 2001-2006," REVISTA DESARROLLO Y SOCIEDAD, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    13. Kohler, Pierre, 2012. "Three essays on the economic and cultural integration of migrants in Switzerland: putting into perspective the influence of economic discrimination and of host society culture," MPRA Paper 38129, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Launov, Andrey, 2004. "An Alternative Approach to Testing Dual Labour Market Theory," IZA Discussion Papers 1289, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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