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The impact of information from similar or different advisors on judgment

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  • Gino, Francesca
  • Shang, Jen
  • Croson, Rachel

Abstract

People rely on others' advice to make judgments on a daily basis. In three studies, we examine the differential impacts of similarity between the source of that advice and the person making the judgment in two settings: judging others' behavior and judging one's own actions. We find that similarity interacts with the target of the judgment. In particular, information received from a different advisor is more heavily weighed than from a similar advisor in judging others' actions, but information from a similar advisor is more heavily weighed than from a different advisor in judging one's own. We provide two potential explanations for this interaction, difficulty of the judgment and informativeness of the advice. Our analyses show a moderated mediating role of informativeness and difficulty in the relationship between the advisor's similarity by judgment type interaction and advice use.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

Volume (Year): 108 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 287-302

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:108:y:2009:i:2:p:287-302

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

Related research

Keywords: Advice taking Similarity Judgment Difficulty Informativeness;

References

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  1. Phillips, Katherine W. & Loyd, Denise Lewin, 2006. "When surface and deep-level diversity collide: The effects on dissenting group members," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 143-160, March.
  2. Patt, Anthony G. & Bowles, Hannah Riley & Cash, David W., 2006. "Mechanisms for Enhancing the Credibility of an Adviser: Prepayment and Aligned Incentives," Working Paper Series rwp06-010, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  3. Yaniv, Ilan & Kleinberger, Eli, 2000. "Advice Taking in Decision Making: Egocentric Discounting and Reputation Formation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 260-281, November.
  4. Sniezek, Janet A. & Van Swol, Lyn M., 2001. "Trust, Confidence, and Expertise in a Judge-Advisor System," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 288-307, March.
  5. Sniezek, Janet A. & Buckley, Timothy, 1995. "Cueing and Cognitive Conflict in Judge-Advisor Decision Making," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 159-174, May.
  6. Harvey, Nigel & Fischer, Ilan, 1997. "Taking Advice: Accepting Help, Improving Judgment, and Sharing Responsibility," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 117-133, May.
  7. Yaniv, Ilan, 2004. "Receiving other people's advice: Influence and benefit," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 1-13, January.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. See, Kelly E. & Morrison, Elizabeth W. & Rothman, Naomi B. & Soll, Jack B., 2011. "The detrimental effects of power on confidence, advice taking, and accuracy," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 116(2), pages 272-285.
  2. Yaniv, Ilan & Choshen-Hillel, Shoham & Milyavsky, Maxim, 2011. "Receiving advice on matters of taste: Similarity, majority influence, and taste discrimination," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 111-120, May.

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