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Effectiveness of state-level vaccination mandates: Evidence from the varicella vaccine

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  • Abrevaya, Jason
  • Mulligan, Karen

Abstract

This paper utilizes longitudinal data on varicella (chickenpox) immunizations in order to estimate the causal effects of state-level school-entry and daycare-entry immunization mandates within the United States. We find significant causal effects of mandates upon vaccination rates among preschool children aged 19–35 months; these effects appear in the year of mandate adoption, peak two years after adoption, and show a minimal difference from the aggregate trend about six years after adoption. For a mandate enacted in 2000, the model and estimates imply that roughly 20% of the short-run increase in state-level immunization rates was caused by the mandate introduction. We find no evidence of differential effects for different socioeconomic groups. Combined with previous cost–benefit analyses of the varicella vaccine, the estimates suggest that state-level mandates have been effective from an economic standpoint.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 966-976

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:5:p:966-976

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

Related research

Keywords: Vaccination; State mandates; Varicella; Longitudinal data;

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  1. Justin Wolfers, 2006. "Did Unilateral Divorce Laws Raise Divorce Rates? A Reconciliation and New Results," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1802-1820, December.
  2. Leora Friedberg, 1998. "Did Unilateral Divorce Raise Divorce Rates? Evidence from Panel Data," NBER Working Papers 6398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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