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Money and the consumption goods market in China

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  • Portes, Richard
  • Santorum, Anita

Abstract

This paper studies the relations between money and other macroeconomic variables as well as excess demand in the consumption goods market for the case of China, 1954-83. We explicitly recognize the endogeneity of money in the CPE and do not impose (but instead test) some common restrictive assumptions; we assess the extent of aggregate excess demand (supply) in a macroeconomic disequilibrium model; and we allow at the macro level for the possible coexistence of micro markets in different states of excess demand or supply (shortages or slacks). We find bidirectional causality between money and income; that M[sub0] behaves in a manner more suited to building simple, conventional models than does M[sub 2]; and that there has been a mixed pattern of excess supplies and demands over the three decades.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Comparative Economics.

Volume (Year): 11 (1987)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 354-371

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:11:y:1987:i:3:p:354-371

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622864

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References

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  1. Feltenstein, Andrew & Lebow, David & van Wijnbergen, Sweder, 1990. "Savings, Commodity Market Rationing, and the Real Rate of Interest in China," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 22(2), pages 234-52, May.
  2. Feltenstein, Andrew & Farhadian, Ziba, 1987. "Fiscal Policy, Monetary Targets, and the Price Level in a Centrally Planned Economy: An Application to the Case of China," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 19(2), pages 137-56, May.
  3. Spanos,Aris, 1986. "Statistical Foundations of Econometric Modelling," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521269124, October.
  4. Portes, Richard & Winter, David, 1980. "Disequilibrium Estimates for Consumption Goods Markets in Centrally Planned Economies," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 137-59, January.
  5. Chow, Gregory C, 1985. "A Model of Chinese National Income Determination," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(4), pages 782-92, August.
  6. Hwang, Hae-shin, 1985. "Test of the Adjustment Process and Linear Homogeneity in a Stock Adjustment Model of Money Demand," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(4), pages 689-92, November.
  7. Richard Portes, 1986. "The Theory and Measurement of Macroeconomic Disequilibrium in Centrally Planned Economies," NBER Working Papers 1875, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-38, July.
  9. Portes, Richard & Winter, David, 1978. "The Demand for Money and for Consumption Goods in Centrally Planned Economies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(1), pages 8-18, February.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Aaron Mehrotra, 2008. "Demand for Money in Transition: Evidence from China’s Disinflation," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 36-47, February.
  2. Andrew Feltenstein & Saleh M. Nsouli, 2001. "Big Bang Versus Gradualism in Economic Reforms," IMF Working Papers 01/98, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Bredin, Don & Cuthbertson, Keith, 2001. "Liquidity Effects and Precautionary Saving in The Czech Republic," Research Technical Papers 4/RT/01, Central Bank of Ireland.
  4. Mookerjee, Rajen & Peebles, Gavin, 1998. "Endogenous money in China: Evidence and insights on recent policies," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 139-158.
  5. Feltenstein, Andrew & Jiming Ha, 1993. "An analysis of repressed inflation in three transitional economies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1132, The World Bank.
  6. Guy Shaojia Liu & Haiyan Song, 2003. "A Dual-Price Demand Theory for Economies under Transition," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 185-203.
  7. Salima Hamouche, 1993. "Contribution à l'étude du déséquilibre sur le marché algérien des biens de consommation," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 108(2), pages 63-74.
  8. Yu, Qiao, 1997. "Economic Fluctuation, Macro Control, and Monetary Policy in the Transitional Chinese Economy," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 180-195, October.

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