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Socio-economic inequalities in child survival in India: A decomposition analysis

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  • Pradhan, Jalandhar
  • Arokiasamy, Perianayagam
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    Abstract

    This paper provides a first time assessment of the decomposed contributions of socio-economic determinants of under2 child mortality in India and its states using the recent National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005-06) data. In the first stage analysis, concentration indices of under2 mortality were generated as measures of socio-economic inequalities. The concentration indices were then decomposed into their determining factors. Decomposition results reveal that poor household economic status (46%), mother's illiteracy (35%) and rural residence (15%) contribute to 96% of total socio-economic inequalities in child survival at the national level. The contribution of economic status is relatively smaller in 5 states that are advanced in health transition. The varying pattern of evidence across the states from decomposition analysis suggests the need for unique health intervention strategies for different states in accordance with the evidence of major contributions to total child health inequalities arising from poverty, illiteracy and rural residence.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Health Policy.

    Volume (Year): 98 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2-3 (December)
    Pages: 114-120

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:98:y:2010:i:2-3:p:114-120

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthpol

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    Keywords: Health Inequalities Decomposition Contributions Socio-economic determinants;

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    1. Wagstaff, Adam & van Doorslaer, Eddy & Watanabe, Naoko, 2003. "On decomposing the causes of health sector inequalities with an application to malnutrition inequalities in Vietnam," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 207-223, January.
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    3. Eddy van Doorslaer & Xander Koolman, 2004. "Explaining the differences in income-related health inequalities across European countries," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 609-628.
    4. van Doorslaer, Eddy & Wagstaff, Adam & Bleichrodt, Han & Calonge, Samuel & Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Gerfin, Michael & Geurts, Jose & Gross, Lorna & Hakkinen, Unto & Leu, Robert E., 1997. "Income-related inequalities in health: some international comparisons," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 93-112, February.
    5. Lerman, Robert I. & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 1989. "Improving the accuracy of estimates of Gini coefficients," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 43-47, September.
    6. Wagstaff, Adam & Nga Nguyet Nguyen, 2002. "Poverty and survival prospects of Vietnamese children under Doi Moi," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2832, The World Bank.
    7. Wagstaff, Adam, 1991. "QALYs and the equity-efficiency trade-off," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 21-41, May.
    8. Wagstaff, Adam, 2002. "Inequality aversion, health inequalities and health achievement," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 627-641, July.
    9. JØrgen Lauridsen & Terkel Christiansen & Jens Gundgaard & Unto Häkkinen & Harri Sintonen, 2007. "Decomposition of health inequality by determinants and dimensions," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 97-102.
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    Cited by:
    1. Sato, Azusa, 2012. "Do Inequalities in Health Care Utilization in Developing Countries Change When We Take into Account Traditional Medicines?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(11), pages 2275-2289.
    2. Hajizadeh, Mohammad & Nandi, Arijit & Heymann, Jody, 2014. "Social inequality in infant mortality: What explains variation across low and middle income countries?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 36-46.
    3. Chalasani, Satvika, 2012. "Understanding wealth-based inequalities in child health in India: A decomposition approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(12), pages 2160-2169.

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