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Big BRICs, weak foundations: The beginning of public elementary education in Brazil, Russia, India, and China

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  • Chaudhary, Latika
  • Musacchio, Aldo
  • Nafziger, Steven
  • Yan, Se

Abstract

Our paper provides a comparative perspective on the development of public primary education in four of the largest developing economies circa 1910: Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC). These four countries encompassed more than 50% of the world's population in 1910, but remarkably few of their citizens attended any school by the early 20th century. We present new, comparable data on school inputs and outputs for BRIC drawn from contemporary surveys and government documents. Recent studies emphasize the importance of political decentralization, and relatively broad political voice for the early spread of public primary education in developed economies. We identify the former and the lack of the latter to be important in the context of BRIC, but we also outline how other factors such as factor endowments, colonialism, serfdom, and, especially, the characteristics of the political and economic elite help explain the low achievement levels of these four countries and the incredible amount of heterogeneity within each of them.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Explorations in Economic History.

Volume (Year): 49 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 221-240

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Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:49:y:2012:i:2:p:221-240

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622830

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Keywords: Brazil; Russia; India; China; Economic history; Education; Political economy; Elites;

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Cited by:
  1. repec:cge:warwcg:73 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Gabriele Cappelli, 2013. "Escaping from a human capital trap? Italy’s regions and the move to centralized primary schooling, 1861 - 1936," Department of Economics University of Siena 688, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  3. Harrison, Mark & Markevich, Andrei, 2012. "Russia’s Home Front, 1914-1922: The Economy," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 74, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  4. Koumparoulis, Dimitrios Nikolaou, 2014. "BRICs versus Other Emerging Economies: The Case of India," MPRA Paper 54388, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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